Current Scholar Profiles

Cohort 21
Harvard University

Dr. Bloch Rubin received her Ph.D. in political science from the University of California, Berkeley in 2014.  She studies American politics, with a substantive focus on legislative institutions, political parties, and American political development.  Combining archival and interview data, her in-progress book manuscript explores how divisions within political parties drive congressional development and structure lawmaking.  Specifically, she shows how rank-and-file lawmakers have relied on intraparty organizations to overcome key collective action and coordination problems in order to challenge their leadership for legislative control.  As a Scholar, she is working on a project that examines Congress’s provision of health services to American Indians in the early nineteenth century.  After completing the program, she will join the Department of Political Science at the University of Chicago as an assistant professor.  

Cohort 20
University of Michigan

Dr. Carey received her Ph.D. in economics from Johns Hopkins University in 2013.  Her research focuses on federal regulation of health insurance markets.  Her dissertation analyzed how risk adjustment in Medicare Part D affects the strategic behavior of insurers and pharmaceutical firms.  Colleen served as a Staff Economist at the Council of Economic Advisers in 2011 and 2012.  After completing the Scholars Program, she will join the Department of Policy Analysis and Management at Cornell University as an assistant professor.  

Cohort 20
University of California, Berkeley/UCSF

Dr. Czaja received her Ph.D. in politics and social policy from Princeton University in 2013. Her research interests span American politics, psychology, race and ethnicity, media effects, inequality, and public policy. Her work investigates how media stories can generate empathy and thus changes in opinion about policies that affect marginalized groups. As a Scholar, she is studying how public opinion regarding the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act can be influenced by empathy-inducing portrayals of individuals.  

Cohort 21
University of Michigan

Dr. Flores received his Ph.D. in sociology and social policy from Princeton University in 2014. His primary research interests are in the fields of international migration, race and ethnicity, and social stratification. His dissertation examined the social consequences of subnational restrictionist immigration policies in the U.S. using administrative, ethnographic, and social media data. Dr. Flores’s current research projects include an experimental study of the consequences of interracial relationships, an investigation on the relationship between community violence and mental health, and a set of papers assessing the adaptation of second-generation immigrants in Europe. He will begin his appointment as Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Washington in fall 2016.                

Cohort 20
University of Michigan

Dr. Gaddis received his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2013.  His primary research interests include the sociology of education, mental health and stigma, and racial/ethnic inequality.  His dissertation examined the effects of educational credentials and prevalence of discrimination in the labor market using a field experiment.  As a Scholar, he studies mental health, stigma, and academic achievement among college students with a particular focus on the effects of institutional factors and policies.  After completing the program, he will join the Department of Sociology at the Pennsylvania State University as an assistant professor.                                    

Cohort 21
Harvard University

Dr. Goldstein received his PhD in sociology at the University of California, Berkeley in 2014. He is an economic sociologist with interests in finance, economic risk, and social inequality. His current research focuses on institutional change and social stratification in health insurance markets. Upon completing the program, he will assume a position as Assistant Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs at Princeton.

Cohort 21
University of California, Berkeley/UCSF

Dr. Goodman-Bacon holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan. His research focuses on the health and social policy reforms of Lyndon Johnson's Great Society.  His work combines historical data collection methods with econometric program evaluation techniques to provide new evidence on the effects of these policy changes of program participation and health.  Current research includes an evaluation of the mortality effects of the original introduction of Medicaid and of the Community Health Center program, and projects that describe the determinants of participation in transfer programs in the 1960s and 1970s.  After completing the Program he will assume a position as Assistant Professor of Economics at Vanderbilt University.

Cohort 21
University of Michigan

Dr. Hair received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin – Madison in 2014. Her primary research interests are in the fields of public economics and health economics. Her recent research considers the economic costs associated with chronic illness and disability, in particular the spillover effects an individual’s poor health status may have on the human capital and labor market outcomes of co-residential family members. Ongoing work examines the potentially heterogeneous effects of insurance coverage for individuals from diverse populations and backgrounds.

Cohort 21
University of Michigan

Dr. Haselswerdt earned a Ph.D. in political science from The George Washington University in 2014 and is currently on leave from the University of Missouri, where he will begin work as a faculty member in the Department of Political Science and the Truman School of Public Affairs in 2016.  His research focuses on the politics of public policy.  His RWJF research examines the political causes and consequences of state-level implementation decisions under the Affordable Care Act, particularly the Medicaid expansion.

Cohort 21
University of California, Berkeley/UCSF
Dr. Lara-Millan received a Ph.D. in sociology from Northwestern University in 2013.  Armando is an ethnographer and historical sociologist.  His research interests include the fields of health policy, mass imprisonment, and political sociology.  He is completing a book manuscript examining how overwhelmed public institutions like public hospitals and county jails are able to, despite disastrous underfunding, provide services to large numbers of people and create an illusion of policy success.  In the Program, Armando is pursuing a project on the social construction of medical prices.  After completing the Program, he will assume a position as Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at UC Berkeley. 
Cohort 20
University of Michigan

Dr. McGrath holds a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Iowa and is currently on leave from George Mason University, where he is an Assistant Professor of Government and Politics in the School of Policy, Government, and International Affairs. Dr. McGrath is generally interested in how the structure of formal governmental institutions serves to constrain and shape policy choices by key actors. In particular, he is currently interested in issues related to inter-branch bargaining between executives and legislatures, such as policy-motivated legislative oversight of bureaucracy and the politics of administrative rulemaking at the state and national levels.

Cohort 20
University of California, Berkeley/UCSF

Dr. McKay received her Ph.D. in sociology from the University of California, Los Angeles in 2013. Her primary research interests are in the fields of medical sociology and sexualities. Her dissertation was a cross-national, mixed-methods study of the global policy response to AIDS focusing on how new priorities emerge and are diffused throughout the global system. Dr. McKay’s current research examines the spillover effects of uninsurance and the impact of the Affordable Care Act on community structure and functioning in California. After completing the Program, she will assume a position as Assistant Professor in the Center for Medicine, Health and Society at Vanderbilt University.

Cohort 20
Harvard University

Dr. Navon holds a Ph.D. in sociology from Columbia University. In Fall 2015 he will be starting as an assistant professor of sociology at UC San Diego. He received a degree in philosophy from the University of Edinburgh before coming to Columbia in 2006 and developing research and teaching interests in the sociology of science and medicine, historical sociology and social theory. His ongoing research uses comparative-historical methods, citation analysis and fieldwork to study the way that genetics is reshaping medical classification and practice. It shows how the discovery of genetic mutations can lead to the delineation of new disease categories, even when they lack clinical coherence, and be mobilized by experts and advocates as both new forms of illness and privileged sites of biomedical knowledge production.

Cohort 20
University of California, Berkeley/UCSF

Dr. Niedzwiecki received a Ph.D. in economics from UC San Diego in 2013. His research is focused primarily on public health insurance programs in the United States. One line of research looks at the value of public health insurance expansion, with a focus on low-income families. A second line of research looks at how public health insurance expansions may have positive spillover effects onto private markets. Finally, a third line of research looks at patient use of the emergency department and how policies designed to redirect patients with low-acuity conditions away from the ED affect patient outcomes. He will be joining the Department of Emergency Medicine and the Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies at UCSF in the fall.

Cohort 21
Harvard University

Dr. Sacarny holds a PhD in Economics from MIT. His dissertation focused on the distribution and determinants of health care productivity, with a particular emphasis on payment policy. This research utilized approaches from industrial organization and labor economics and applied them to the health care sector. He is currently working on two randomized evaluations: one studying an attempt to reduce fraud and abuse in Medicare Part D with informative letters, and the other studying the effect of sending information about insurance plans to ACA exchange enrollees. After completing the Program, he will begin a position as Assistant Professor in the Health Policy and Management Department of the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.

Cohort 21
University of California, Berkeley/UCSF

Dr. Sadin completed her Ph.D. in the Department of Politics at Princeton University, focusing on political behavior, experimental methods and inequality. Meredith's research explores the ways in which attitudes towards the rich are consequential for policy preferences and candidate choice. Her more recent work on health policy examines the ways in which partisanship, information, and personal experience interact to affect insurance take-up, specific perceptions of the ACA, broader attitudes toward government and politics, and patterns of political participation. She is a recipient of the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship and the National Science Foundation Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grant and her work has been published in Journal of Politics, Political Psychology, and Public Opinion Quarterly

Cohort 20
Harvard University

Dr. Staszak received a Ph.D. in political science from Brandeis University in 2010 and is currently on leave from The City College of New York—CUNY, where she is an assistant professor in the Political Science Department.  Her research interests include public law, policy, and American political development.  Her book, No Day in Court: The Politics of Judicial Retrenchment (forthcoming 2014) examines the politics and implications of efforts to constrain access to courts and the legal system as they have unfolded in the years since the expansions of the civil rights era.  As a Scholar, she is beginning a project on litigation in the area of mental health and disability, examining the politics and consequences of relying on courts and judges to enforce rights guarantees.  Her other ongoing research projects focus on the politics of bureaucratic rulemaking and the development of legal services for the poor in the United States.

Cohort 20
Harvard University

Dr. Veazey Brooks holds a Ph.D. in sociology and a Masters of Bioethics, both from the University of Pennsylvania. Her research interests focus on the sociology of work and professions and the sociology of health care. She has a continued interest in medical education and training, including the development of occupational and professional identities. Current research examines the role of culture in quality improvement initiatives and the impact of the transformation of primary care medicine delivery on trainees.