Sociology of Knowledge - Science, knowledge and technology

Elizabeth M. Armstrong Ph.D., M.P.A.

Cohort 5 — Michigan Alumni List
Associate Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs, Department of Sociology and Woodrow Wilson School of Public & International Affairs
Princeton University, Princeton , NJ

Dr. Armstrong has a PhD from the University of Pennsylvania and a MPA from Princeton University. Her research interests in public health, the history and sociology of medicine, social determinants of health, and medical ethics. She is the author of Conceiving Risk, Bearing Responsibility: Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and the Diagnosis of Moral Disorder (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003) and articles on family planning, medical mistakes, adolescent motherhood, and the sociology of pregnancy and birth. Her current research includes a longitudinal study of agenda setting around disease in the U.S. and a study of fetal personhood and obstetrical ethics. She holds a joint appointment in the department of sociology and the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University and is a faculty associate at both the Office of Population Research and the Center for Health and Wellbeing there.

Discipline: Sociology
		

John H. Evans Ph.D.

Cohort 5 — Yale Alumni List
Professor, Department of Sociology
University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA

Dr. Evans received both his PhD and MA in Sociology from Princeton University. He received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Macalester College. He serves as a Visiting member of the School of Social Sciences at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, NJ, a postdoctoral fellow at the Scholars Program at Yale University and a Visiting Professorial Fellow at the University of Edinburgh. He is the author of Playing God? Human Genetic Engineering and the Rationalization of Public Bioethical Debate. (2002, University of Chicago Press) and Contested Reproduction: Genetic Technologies, Religion, and Public Debate (2010, University of Chicago Press.) He has also published many articles on opinion polarization in the U.S. over abortion, homosexuality and related issues; science, health and religion; the sociology of religion; and the structure of public bioethical debates.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Jeremy Freese Ph.D.

Cohort 12 — Harvard Alumni List
Professor, Department of Sociology
Stanford University, Stanford, CA

Dr. Freese received his PhD from Indiana University. He was a member of the faculty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison until 2006. His research is on the interaction among biological, psychological, and social levels of analysis, especially in the context of technological or policy change.  His work has been published in American Sociological Review, American Journal of Sociology, Social Psychology Quarterly, Journal of Health and Social Behavior, and Demography.  He has co-authored a book on regression models for categorical outcomes.  He is currently a Principal Investigator of Time-sharing Experiments in the Social Sciences (TESS), an NSF initiative to promote survey experiments in social science and policy research.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Lei Jin Ph.D.

Cohort 12 — Harvard Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China

Dr. Jin received both her PhD in Sociology and Master of Science in Statistics from the University of Chicago. Her overarching research interest lies in the interplay of health, medicine and social systems. She has published in journals such as Demography, Social Science & Medicine, Social Science Research and Health Affairs, among others. Jin's work falls into two areas: the social determinants of health and the social organisation of health care. In the first area, she has examined how people's social relationships are linked to their health-related outcomes. She has published papers assessing how marital status affects the utilisation of health care and how local and trans-local social ties influence rural-to-urban migrants'mental health by shaping their social comparisons. She is also interested in delineating how structural inequality affects individual health through psychosocial pathways. In her current projects, she is investigating how relative social status, status inconsistency and social mobility influence health, the consequences of migration for psychological well-being and the health effects of contextual social inequality in China. In the area of social organization of health care, she has studied patient-doctor interaction in the US and the changing patterns in the use of Chinese medicine in China. Her on-going project focuses on professional autonomy among physicians in China's public hospital reforms.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Aaron Panofsky Ph.D.

Cohort 13 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor of Public Policy, UCLA School of Public Affairs and Center for Society and Genetics
University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA

Dr. Panofsky received his PhD in Sociology from New York University in 2006. Dr. Panofsky is a specialist in the sociology of science and knowledge and is interested in ways that biological and genetic knowledge are intersecting domains of social and health policy. His recent book Misbehaving Science: Controversy and the Development of Behavior Genetics (Chicago, 2014) is a historical account of the causes and consequences of controversy in the field of behavioral genetics. His research on science, genetics, policy, and health activism has been published in diverse sources including Annual Review of Genetics, Social Studies of Science, Policy and Society, Genome Medicine, and Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology

Discipline: Sociology
		

Abigail C. Saguy Ph.D.

Cohort 7 — Yale Alumni List
Professor, Department of Sociology
Associate Professor, Department of Women’s Studies
University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA

Dr. Saguy received both her PhD and MA in Sociology from Princeton University and her Bachelor of Arts degree from College of Letters, Wesleyan Univeresity. My teaching and research interests include gender, culture, the body, politics, law and public health. Her interest also include in how cultural schemas shape power relations and how subordinate groups are sometimes able to create new cultural meaning to increase their control. She pursued these interests through my comparative research on sexual harassment definitions and on framing contests over fatness. In these “hot” or highly contested topics, social actors make their cultural assumptions explicit, making them ideally suited to cultural analysis. In her work, she used multiple methods and cross-national, cross-issue, and cross-institutional comparisons. In recent years, the “obesity epidemic” has emerged as a top public health concern in the United States and abroad. Scholars, journalists, and politicians alike are scrambling to find answers. What or who is responsible for this crisis and what can be done to stop it? In contrast, in What's Wrong with Fat? (WWwF?) She argues that these fraught debates obscure more important sociological questions: How has fatness come to be understood as a public health crisis at all? Why has the view of fatness as a medical problem and public health crisis come to dominate more positive framings of weight – as consistent with health, beauty, or a legitimate rights claim—in public discourse? Why are heavy individuals singled out for blame? And what are the consequences of understanding weight in these ways? Building on WWwF?, she conducted a series of ongoing experments with David Frederick (Psychology, Chapman University) that examine the effect of reading different news articles about body weight have on attitudes about health, health policy, and weight-based prejudice. In a collaboration with French sociologists Henri Bergeron and Patrick Castell, she is investigating the extent to which frames shape policy, focusing specifically on the case of French obesity policy. Her latest book is "What's Wrong with Fat? (2013, Oxford University Press) and What is Sexual Harassment? From Capitol Hill to the Sorbonne (2003, University of California Press).

Discipline: Sociology