Social Inequalities - Poverty and inequality

Dalton Conley Ph.D.

Cohort 3 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Henry Putnam University Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology
Princeton University, Princeton, NJ

Dr. Conley received his PhD in sociology from Columbia University in 1996 and a PhD in Biology (Genomics) from NYU in 2014. His research focuses on how socio-economic status and health are transmitted across generations and on the public policies that affect those processes. He studies sibling differences in socioeconomic success; racial inequalities; the measurement of class; and how health and biology affect (and are affected by) social position. His publications include Being Black, Living in the Red; The Starting GateHonky; The Pecking Order; You May Ask Yourself; and Parentology. He is a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and has been the recipient of Guggenheim, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Russell Sage Foundation fellowships as well as a CAREER award and the Alan T. Waterman Award of the National Science Foundation.

 

His current work applies econometric methods for causal inference--namely, a natural experiment framework--to genome-wide data available in social surveys to model gene-by-environment interaction effects.  Examples in this vein include deploying the Vietnam draft lottery, twin differences in birth weight, exogenous job loss (such as plant closure), and sibling differences in genotype (polygenic scores) to questions of health, development and socioeconomic attainment across the life course.  I am also interested in mapping the genetic architecture of phenotypic plasticity, interrogating the assumptions underlying models for heritability, and characterizing social and genetic sorting as distinct processes.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Daniel P. Dohan Ph.D.

Cohort 4 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Professor, Phillip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies and UCSF/UC Hastings Consortium on Law, Science, and Health Policy
Deputy Director, Phillip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies
University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA

Dr. Dohan received his PhD in Sociology from University of California-Berkeley. He is also Co-Director, UCSF/UC Hasting Consortium on Law, Science, and Health Policy. His research examines the culture of medicine. Dr. Dohan received his PhD in Sociology from University of California-Berkeley.

Dr. Dohan's research focuses broadly on the culture of medicine. He leads a project to develop innovative methods to integrate qualitative and narrative data into clinical decision-making and patient-centered outcomes research. In collaboration with the campus’ precision medicine initiative, he is developing stakeholder-engaged approaches for educating patients about precision medicine and to support their involvement in precision medicine research. Finally, he is collaborating with the UCSF Center for Surgery in Older Adults on ways to better align surgical treatment decision-making with frail elders’ overall goals of care.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Nicole Esparza Ph.D.

Cohort 14 — Harvard Alumni List
Associate Professor of Public Affairs, Sol Price School of Public Policy
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

Dr. Esparza received her Ph.D. in sociology from Princeton University in 2007. Her research interests include organizational dynamics, urban inequality, and economic sociology.  Dr. Esparza's dissertation used a multi-method approach to examine nonprofit organizations in twenty-six U.S. metropolitan areas.  This research explored how inter-organizational dynamics and social and political context affect the distribution of homeless services.  As a Scholar, she studied hospital patient “dumping,” a practice in which hospitals avoid high-cost patients by refusing to admit, transferring, and/or releasing patients in unstable conditions.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Kristen S. Harknett Ph.D.

Cohort 9 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Dr. Harknett received her PhD in Sociology and Demography from Princeton University in 2002. Her research is motivated by the sociological contention that a person's social environment influences his or her most personal and important decisions, sometimes in ways that may not be apparent to the individuals involved. She demonstrates this idea by studying the role of context – city of residence, school, or labor market – in shaping romantic relationships. Her research shows that male shortages and weak labor markets act as impediments to stable romantic relationships. One innovation in her research is to demonstrate that male shortages matter not only during the process of searching for a romantic partner, but they also influence the dynamics and trajectories of relationships that have already formed. In a second line of research, she investigates the importance of “private safety nets” comprised of supportive family members and friends. In this research, she examines how social support is unevenly distributed across individuals, and the consequences of lacking social support. Some of the topics she explores include the bi-directional relationship between fertility and social support, the correlation between personal and social network disadvantages, and the relationship between social support and psychological and material well-being.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Christine M. Percheski Ph.D.

Cohort 15 — Harvard Alumni List
Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology
Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

Dr. Percheski received her PhD in Sociology at Princeton University. Dr. Percheski's studies how recent and ongoing changes in family life are related to changing patterns of social inequality in the United States. Her previous work has considered questions such as whether becoming a father affects employment differently for married and unmarried men, how increases in family income inequality are related to increasing women's employment and single motherhood, how employment patterns have changed across birth cohorts of college-educated women in professional occupations, and how childhood family experiences are associated with non-marital births during early adulthood. Percheski has also examined the relationship between family characteristics and social inequality  in several domains including poverty risk during the recent recession, health insurance coverage for adults, and health care utilization among children. Dr. Percheski's current research portfolio includes an NSF-funded examination of wealth inequality in the United States. In collaboration with Christina Gibson-Davis, Percheski is assessing trends in the wealth of households with children relative to the elderly, variations in wealth by family structure, and racial gaps in wealth poverty.

Discipline: Sociology