Social Inequalities - Gender

Pamela Herd (ext. site) Ph.D.

Cohort 9 — Michigan Alumni List
Professor of Public Affairs and Sociology, LaFollette School of Public Affairs and Department of Sociology
Faculty Affiliate, Institute for Research on Poverty
University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI

Dr. Herd received her PhD in Sociology from Syracuse University and her Bachelor of Arts degree from Colby College. Her work focuses on aging, policy, health, and inequality. She has two streams of research. One stream examines how social policies (i.e., Social Security) affect gender, race, and class inequalities. The second stream focuses on the relationship between social factors and health. She is the Principal Investigator of the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, a member of the Board of Overseers of the General Social Survey, a member of the Board of Overseers of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, and a member of the National Academy of Social Insurance.

Herd co-authored the 2007 book Market Friendly or Family Friendly? The State and Gender Inequality in Old Age with Madonna Harrington Meyer. The book is part of the American Sociological Association's Rose Series on Public Policy and was the winner of the Gerontological Society of America Section on Behavioral and Social Sciences Kalish Publication Award. She is author of numerous articles and chapters that have appeared in Social Forces, Gender and Society, Journals of Gerontology, Journal of Health and Social Behavior, and The Gerontologist among others.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Deborah L. Little (ext. site) J.D., Ph.D.

Cohort 8 — Michigan Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology & Sociology
Adelphi University, Garden City, NY

Dr. Little receiver her PhD Sociology, University of California Berkeley (2001), her JD Magna Cum Laude, Georgetown University Law Center (1981) and her M.A. Sociology, University of California Berkeley (1989). Her research interests are Carework, disability, social movements. Her latest publications are: "Building a Movement of Caring Selves: Organizing Direct Care Workers." In Mignon Duffy, Amy Armenia, Clare L. Stacey (Eds.). Caring on the Clock: The Complexities and Contradictions of Paid Work. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press. (2015), "Sit Home and Collect the Check": Race, Class, and the Social Construction of Disability Identity. In Barnartt, Sharon N. (Eds.). Disability as a Fluid State. (pp. 183-202). Bingley: Emerald Group. (2010), "Teaching toward Praxis and Political Engagement. In David Fasenfest (Eds.). Engaging Social Justice: Critical Studies of 21st Century Social Transformation." Leiden: Brill. (2009) and "From 'Giving Care' to 'Taking Care': Negotiating Care-Work at Welfare's End." In Maurice Hamington and Dorothy C. Miller (Eds.). Socializing Care: Feminist Ethics and Public Issues (Feminist Constructions Series). (pp. 121-141). Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield. (2007)

Discipline: Sociology
		

Abigail C. Saguy (ext. site) Ph.D.

Cohort 7 — Yale Alumni List
Professor, Department of Sociology
Associate Professor, Department of Women’s Studies
University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA

Dr. Saguy received both her PhD and MA in Sociology from Princeton University and her Bachelor of Arts degree from College of Letters, Wesleyan Univeresity. My teaching and research interests include gender, culture, the body, politics, law and public health. Her interest also include in how cultural schemas shape power relations and how subordinate groups are sometimes able to create new cultural meaning to increase their control. She pursued these interests through my comparative research on sexual harassment definitions and on framing contests over fatness. In these “hot” or highly contested topics, social actors make their cultural assumptions explicit, making them ideally suited to cultural analysis. In her work, she used multiple methods and cross-national, cross-issue, and cross-institutional comparisons. In recent years, the “obesity epidemic” has emerged as a top public health concern in the United States and abroad. Scholars, journalists, and politicians alike are scrambling to find answers. What or who is responsible for this crisis and what can be done to stop it? In contrast, in What's Wrong with Fat? (WWwF?) She argues that these fraught debates obscure more important sociological questions: How has fatness come to be understood as a public health crisis at all? Why has the view of fatness as a medical problem and public health crisis come to dominate more positive framings of weight – as consistent with health, beauty, or a legitimate rights claim—in public discourse? Why are heavy individuals singled out for blame? And what are the consequences of understanding weight in these ways? Building on WWwF?, she conducted a series of ongoing experments with David Frederick (Psychology, Chapman University) that examine the effect of reading different news articles about body weight have on attitudes about health, health policy, and weight-based prejudice. In a collaboration with French sociologists Henri Bergeron and Patrick Castell, she is investigating the extent to which frames shape policy, focusing specifically on the case of French obesity policy. Her latest book is "What's Wrong with Fat? (2013, Oxford University Press) and What is Sexual Harassment? From Capitol Hill to the Sorbonne (2003, University of California Press).

Discipline: Sociology