Social Inequalities - Social stratification and health

Karen R. Albright Ph.D.

Cohort 11 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology and Criminology, Affiliated Faculty in the Graduate School of Social Work
University of Denver, Denver, CO

Dr. Albright received her PhD in Sociology from New York University. Dr. Albright’s research interests focus on health behaviors among socioeconomically disadvantaged populations, the barriers to their care, and potential solutions for improving care (e.g., collaborations between public health entities and private practices). In recent years, she has become particularly interested in how distrust of pharmaceutical medicine and the U.S. health care system affects health behaviors and outcomes. Dr. Albright’s research has been published in a wide variety of social scientific and medical journals, including American Journal of Public Health, Academic Pediatrics, Sociological Forum, and American Behavioral Scientist. Her research has been funded by, among others, the National Institutes of Health, the Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute, and the National Science Foundation. She is the Vice-President Elect of the Association for Applied and Clinical Sociology. 

Discipline: Sociology
		

Kristen S. Harknett Ph.D.

Cohort 9 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Dr. Harknett received her PhD in Sociology and Demography from Princeton University in 2002. Her research is motivated by the sociological contention that a person's social environment influences his or her most personal and important decisions, sometimes in ways that may not be apparent to the individuals involved. She demonstrates this idea by studying the role of context – city of residence, school, or labor market – in shaping romantic relationships. Her research shows that male shortages and weak labor markets act as impediments to stable romantic relationships. One innovation in her research is to demonstrate that male shortages matter not only during the process of searching for a romantic partner, but they also influence the dynamics and trajectories of relationships that have already formed. In a second line of research, she investigates the importance of “private safety nets” comprised of supportive family members and friends. In this research, she examines how social support is unevenly distributed across individuals, and the consequences of lacking social support. Some of the topics she explores include the bi-directional relationship between fertility and social support, the correlation between personal and social network disadvantages, and the relationship between social support and psychological and material well-being.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Pamela Herd Ph.D.

Cohort 9 — Michigan Alumni List
Professor of Public Affairs and Sociology, LaFollette School of Public Affairs and Department of Sociology
Faculty Affiliate, Institute for Research on Poverty
University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI

Dr. Herd received her PhD in Sociology from Syracuse University and her Bachelor of Arts degree from Colby College. Her work focuses on aging, policy, health, and inequality. She has two streams of research. One stream examines how social policies (i.e., Social Security) affect gender, race, and class inequalities. The second stream focuses on the relationship between social factors and health. She is the Principal Investigator of the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, a member of the Board of Overseers of the General Social Survey, a member of the Board of Overseers of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, and a member of the National Academy of Social Insurance.

Herd co-authored the 2007 book Market Friendly or Family Friendly? The State and Gender Inequality in Old Age with Madonna Harrington Meyer. The book is part of the American Sociological Association's Rose Series on Public Policy and was the winner of the Gerontological Society of America Section on Behavioral and Social Sciences Kalish Publication Award. She is author of numerous articles and chapters that have appeared in Social Forces, Gender and Society, Journals of Gerontology, Journal of Health and Social Behavior, and The Gerontologist among others.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Tiffany D. Joseph Ph.D.

Cohort 18 — Harvard Alumni List
Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology
Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY

Dr. Joseph received her PhD in Sociology from the University of Michigan and Bachelor of Arts degree from Brown University. Dr. Joseph's reearch interests include the influence of immigration on the social construction of race in the U.S., immigrants' health and healthcare access; immigration and health policy, and the experiences of minority faculty in academia. Her current project explores how race and documentation status influences the healthcare access of immigrants under comprehensive health reform.  Her latest book, "Race on the Move" was published by Stanford University Press (2015).

Discipline: Sociology
		

Rashawn Ray Ph.D.

Cohort 17 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
University of Maryland, College Park, College Park, MD

Dr. Ray received his PhD in Sociology from Indiana University. His research addresses the mechanisms that manufacture and maintain racial and social inequality. His work also speaks to ways that inequality may be attenuated through racial uplift activism and social policy. He is the author of Race and Ethnic Relations in the 21st Century: History, Theory, Institutions, and Policy. His work has appeared in journals including the Annual Review of Public Health, Journal of Urban Health, American Education Research Journal, Ethnic and Racial Studies, and the Journal of Contemporary Ethnography. Ray has two forthcoming books: The Loves Jones Cohort: Single and Living Alone in the Black Middle Class with Dr. Kris Marsh and Bordering Chaos: Family and Work in a Racially-Diverse America with Dr. Pam Jackson. Dr. Ray has been awarded funding from the National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Ford Foundation, American Sociological Association Minority Fellowship Program, and the Society for the Study of Social Problems. Ray was selected as 40 Under 40 Prince George’s County in 2014, Outstanding Black Male Leader of Tomorrow for the city of Bloomington, IN in 2010, and the Co-Chair of the Ford Foundation Scholars Conference in 2015. He has been awarded mentorship awards from the Philip Merrill Presidential Scholars Program, Ronald E. McNair Post-Baccalaureate Program, and the Departments of Sociology at the University of Maryland and Indiana University. Previously, Dr. Ray served on the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington Planning Committee and the Commission on Racial Justice with Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. Currently, he serves on the editorial boards for Sociology of Race and Ethnicity and Social Psychology Quarterly as well as the American Sociological Association Committee on the Status of Racial and Ethnic Minorities in Sociology. Dr. Ray is a frequent contributor to the New York Times and has also written for Huffington Post.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Quincy Thomas Stewart Ph.D.

Cohort 13 — Michigan Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
Faculty Fellow, Institute for Policy Research
Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

Dr. Stewart received his PhD in Demography and Sociology from the University of Pennsylvania, and his Bachelor of Science degree in Interdisciplinary Studies from Norfolk State Univeresity. He is interested in the dynamic processes that create inequalities in socioeconomic status, health and mortality. Stewart has published on quantitative methods for studying inequality, the estimation of mortality, and on racial and ethnic disparities in socioeconomic status, health and mortality. His current work includes: 1) analyzing racial inequality using agent-based models, 2) examining the role of disease prevalence in mortality outcomes, and 3) analyzing racial disparities in attitudes, socioeconomic status and health outcomes. Before joining Northwestern in 2011, Professor Stewart was on the faculty at Indiana University for 9 years as a member of the Department of Sociology.

Discipline: Sociology