Social Inequalities

Karen R. Albright (ext. site) Ph.D.

Cohort 11 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology and Criminology, Affiliated Faculty in the Graduate School of Social Work
University of Denver, Denver, CO

Dr. Albright received her PhD in Sociology from New York University. Dr. Albright’s research interests focus on health behaviors among socioeconomically disadvantaged populations, the barriers to their care, and potential solutions for improving care (e.g., collaborations between public health entities and private practices). In recent years, she has become particularly interested in how distrust of pharmaceutical medicine and the U.S. health care system affects health behaviors and outcomes. Dr. Albright’s research has been published in a wide variety of social scientific and medical journals, including American Journal of Public Health, Academic Pediatrics, Sociological Forum, and American Behavioral Scientist. Her research has been funded by, among others, the National Institutes of Health, the Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute, and the National Science Foundation. She is the Vice-President Elect of the Association for Applied and Clinical Sociology. 

Discipline: Sociology
		

Megan Andrew (ext. site) Ph.D.

Cohort 16 — Michigan Alumni List
Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology
https://www.google.com, Notre Dame, IN

Dr. Andrew received her PhD from the University of Wisconsin, Madison in 2009.  Her research focuses on the intergenerational and social psychological determinants of young adults’ education and health attainments.  In previous research, she has evaluated the intergenerational impacts of serious health events in the parent generation, the life course production of education and health attainments among youth and young adults, and the association between socioeconomic segregation and infant health.  Her research has been published in Social Forces, American Journal of Public Health, Social Science Research, Sociological Methodology, and more.  Her research has been funded by the Spencer Foundation, the University of Michigan’s Center for Integrative Approaches to Health Disparities, and Stanford University’s Center on Poverty and Inequality.  

Discipline: Sociology
		

Christopher J. Bonastia (ext. site) Ph.D.

Cohort 8 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
Lehman College and CUNY Graduate Center, Bronx, NY

Dr. Bonastia received his Ph.D. from New York University in 2001.  Dr. Bonastia’s work focuses on historical explorations of race, policy and politics.  His first book, Knocking on the Door: The Federal Government’s Attempt to Desegregate the Suburbs, was published in 2006 by Princeton University Press.  His recent book, Southern Stalemate: Five Years without Public Education in Prince Edward County, Virginia, was published in early 2012 by the University of Chicago Press.  The latter project was funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.  In summer 2011, he was a visiting fellow at the NEH Summer Institute for College and University Teachers at Harvard University.  His work has also been published in the Journal of Policy History (examining civil rights enforcement in health care), the Du Bois Review, Social Science History and Social Problems, among other publications.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Sharon H. Bzostek Ph.D.

Cohort 16 — Harvard Alumni List
Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology
Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ

Dr. Bzostek received her PhD in sociology from Princeton University in 2009. Her primary research interests are in the fields of family demography, childhood inequality, and health disparities. Current research projects include a study of differential self-rating of health by race/ethnicity, an analysis of child health disparities resulting from instability in family structure, a study of the patterns and consequences of health insurance coverage among children in the same family, and an investigation of differences in maternal and paternal reports of children’s health status.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Dalton Conley Ph.D.

Cohort 3 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Henry Putnam University Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology
Princeton University, Princeton, NJ

Dr. Conley received his PhD in sociology from Columbia University in 1996 and a PhD in Biology (Genomics) from NYU in 2014. His research focuses on how socio-economic status and health are transmitted across generations and on the public policies that affect those processes. He studies sibling differences in socioeconomic success; racial inequalities; the measurement of class; and how health and biology affect (and are affected by) social position. His publications include Being Black, Living in the Red; The Starting GateHonky; The Pecking Order; You May Ask Yourself; and Parentology. He is a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and has been the recipient of Guggenheim, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Russell Sage Foundation fellowships as well as a CAREER award and the Alan T. Waterman Award of the National Science Foundation.

 

His current work applies econometric methods for causal inference--namely, a natural experiment framework--to genome-wide data available in social surveys to model gene-by-environment interaction effects.  Examples in this vein include deploying the Vietnam draft lottery, twin differences in birth weight, exogenous job loss (such as plant closure), and sibling differences in genotype (polygenic scores) to questions of health, development and socioeconomic attainment across the life course.  I am also interested in mapping the genetic architecture of phenotypic plasticity, interrogating the assumptions underlying models for heritability, and characterizing social and genetic sorting as distinct processes.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Daniel P. Dohan Ph.D.

Cohort 4 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Professor, Phillip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies and UCSF/UC Hastings Consortium on Law, Science, and Health Policy
Deputy Director, Phillip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies
University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA

Dr. Dohan received his PhD in Sociology from University of California-Berkeley. He is also Co-Director, UCSF/UC Hasting Consortium on Law, Science, and Health Policy. His research examines the culture of medicine. Dr. Dohan received his PhD in Sociology from University of California-Berkeley.

Dr. Dohan's research focuses broadly on the culture of medicine. He leads a project to develop innovative methods to integrate qualitative and narrative data into clinical decision-making and patient-centered outcomes research. In collaboration with the campus’ precision medicine initiative, he is developing stakeholder-engaged approaches for educating patients about precision medicine and to support their involvement in precision medicine research. Finally, he is collaborating with the UCSF Center for Surgery in Older Adults on ways to better align surgical treatment decision-making with frail elders’ overall goals of care.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Nicole Esparza Ph.D.

Cohort 14 — Harvard Alumni List
Associate Professor of Public Affairs, Sol Price School of Public Policy
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

Dr. Esparza received her Ph.D. in sociology from Princeton University in 2007. Her research interests include organizational dynamics, urban inequality, and economic sociology.  Dr. Esparza's dissertation used a multi-method approach to examine nonprofit organizations in twenty-six U.S. metropolitan areas.  This research explored how inter-organizational dynamics and social and political context affect the distribution of homeless services.  As a Scholar, she studied hospital patient “dumping,” a practice in which hospitals avoid high-cost patients by refusing to admit, transferring, and/or releasing patients in unstable conditions.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Jeremy Freese Ph.D.

Cohort 12 — Harvard Alumni List
Professor, Department of Sociology
Stanford University, Stanford, CA

Dr. Freese received his PhD from Indiana University. He was a member of the faculty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison until 2006. His research is on the interaction among biological, psychological, and social levels of analysis, especially in the context of technological or policy change.  His work has been published in American Sociological Review, American Journal of Sociology, Social Psychology Quarterly, Journal of Health and Social Behavior, and Demography.  He has co-authored a book on regression models for categorical outcomes.  He is currently a Principal Investigator of Time-sharing Experiments in the Social Sciences (TESS), an NSF initiative to promote survey experiments in social science and policy research.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Brian Goesling Ph.D.

Cohort 10 — Michigan Alumni List
Associate Director of Human Services Research
Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., Princeton, NJ

Dr.Goesling received his PhD in Sociology from the Pennsylvania State University. His expertise is in social programs and trends affecting families and youth. Dr. Goesling currently serves as project director for the Evaluation of Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Approaches, a large, multisite random assignment evaluation of promising approaches to prevent teen pregnancy. He also directs a systematic evidence review of teen pregnancy prevention programs, serves as principal investigator for a large, multisite random assignment evaluation of healthy relationship programs for youth, and directs an ongoing cost study of evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention programs. He has published more than a dozen scholarly book chapters and journal articles, including articles in the Journal of Adolescent HealthJournal of Health and Social BehaviorAmerican Sociological ReviewAmerican Journal of Sociology, and Social Forces. He coauthored a recent report for the U.S. Department of Education on the largest experimental evaluation to date of the effectiveness of mandatory random student drug testing in U.S. high schools. He has also authored research on systematic reviews, teen pregnancy prevention, teenagers’ attitudes toward marriage, the links between marriage and health, and health care coverage among families with children. 

Discipline: Sociology
		

Drew T. Halfmann Ph.D.

Cohort 8 — Michigan Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
University of California, Davis, Davis, CA

Dr. Halfmann received both his PhD and MA in Sociology from New York University in 2001, and his Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and Economics from the University of Wisconsin in 1990. His research focuses on social movements and the politics of health and social policy.  Professor Halfmann is the author of Doctors and Demonstrators: How Political Institutions Shape Abortion Law in the United States, Britain and Canada (University of Chicago Press, 2011), which won the 2012 Charles Tilly Best Book Award from the Section on Collective Behavior and Social Movements of the American Sociological Association. His research has appeared in the American Sociological Review, Social Problems, Mobilization, HEALTH, Studies in American Political Development, and the Journal of Policy History.  His current research is on the African-American struggle for health equality from Reconstruction to Obamacare.  He is a member of the Scholars Strategy Network and co-director of its Bay Area Regional Network. 

Discipline: Sociology