Population Studies - Social demography

Megan Andrew Ph.D.

Cohort 16 — Michigan Alumni List
Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology
University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN

Dr. Andrew received her PhD from the University of Wisconsin, Madison in 2009.  Her research focuses on the intergenerational and social psychological determinants of young adults’ education and health attainments.  In previous research, she has evaluated the intergenerational impacts of serious health events in the parent generation, the life course production of education and health attainments among youth and young adults, and the association between socioeconomic segregation and infant health.  Her research has been published in Social Forces, American Journal of Public Health, Social Science Research, Sociological Methodology, and more.  Her research has been funded by the Spencer Foundation, the University of Michigan’s Center for Integrative Approaches to Health Disparities, and Stanford University’s Center on Poverty and Inequality.  

Discipline: Sociology
		

Brian K. Finch Ph.D.

Cohort 7 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Research Professor of Sociology & Spatial Sciences
Director, Southern California Population Research Center
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

Dr. Finch received his PhD in Sociology from the University of Texas-Austin, a MA in Sociology from San Diego State University and his Bachelor of Arts degree in Peace and Conflict Studies from the University of California-Berkeley. Dr. Finch’s work crosses the disciplinary boundaries of social demography, social epidemiology and medical sociology to investigate the causes and correlates of population health disparities. Specifically, Finch analyzes socioeconomic and race/ethnic disparities in health outcomes and behaviors among adults and biological/social interactions across the early life course.
 

Discipline: Sociology
Health Policy Interests: Social Epidemiology
		

Kristen S. Harknett Ph.D.

Cohort 9 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Dr. Harknett received her PhD in Sociology and Demography from Princeton University in 2002. Her research is motivated by the sociological contention that a person's social environment influences his or her most personal and important decisions, sometimes in ways that may not be apparent to the individuals involved. She demonstrates this idea by studying the role of context – city of residence, school, or labor market – in shaping romantic relationships. Her research shows that male shortages and weak labor markets act as impediments to stable romantic relationships. One innovation in her research is to demonstrate that male shortages matter not only during the process of searching for a romantic partner, but they also influence the dynamics and trajectories of relationships that have already formed. In a second line of research, she investigates the importance of “private safety nets” comprised of supportive family members and friends. In this research, she examines how social support is unevenly distributed across individuals, and the consequences of lacking social support. Some of the topics she explores include the bi-directional relationship between fertility and social support, the correlation between personal and social network disadvantages, and the relationship between social support and psychological and material well-being.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Christine M. Percheski Ph.D.

Cohort 15 — Harvard Alumni List
Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology
Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

Dr. Percheski received her PhD in Sociology at Princeton University. Dr. Percheski's studies how recent and ongoing changes in family life are related to changing patterns of social inequality in the United States. Her previous work has considered questions such as whether becoming a father affects employment differently for married and unmarried men, how increases in family income inequality are related to increasing women's employment and single motherhood, how employment patterns have changed across birth cohorts of college-educated women in professional occupations, and how childhood family experiences are associated with non-marital births during early adulthood. Percheski has also examined the relationship between family characteristics and social inequality  in several domains including poverty risk during the recent recession, health insurance coverage for adults, and health care utilization among children. Dr. Percheski's current research portfolio includes an NSF-funded examination of wealth inequality in the United States. In collaboration with Christina Gibson-Davis, Percheski is assessing trends in the wealth of households with children relative to the elderly, variations in wealth by family structure, and racial gaps in wealth poverty.

Discipline: Sociology