Population Studies

Megan Andrew Ph.D.

Cohort 16 — Michigan Alumni List
Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology
University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN

Dr. Andrew received her PhD from the University of Wisconsin, Madison in 2009.  Her research focuses on the intergenerational and social psychological determinants of young adults’ education and health attainments.  In previous research, she has evaluated the intergenerational impacts of serious health events in the parent generation, the life course production of education and health attainments among youth and young adults, and the association between socioeconomic segregation and infant health.  Her research has been published in Social Forces, American Journal of Public Health, Social Science Research, Sociological Methodology, and more.  Her research has been funded by the Spencer Foundation, the University of Michigan’s Center for Integrative Approaches to Health Disparities, and Stanford University’s Center on Poverty and Inequality.  

Discipline: Sociology
		

Elizabeth M. Armstrong Ph.D., M.P.A.

Cohort 5 — Michigan Alumni List
Associate Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs, Department of Sociology and Woodrow Wilson School of Public & International Affairs
Princeton University, Princeton , NJ

Dr. Armstrong has a PhD from the University of Pennsylvania and a MPA from Princeton University. Her research interests in public health, the history and sociology of medicine, social determinants of health, and medical ethics. She is the author of Conceiving Risk, Bearing Responsibility: Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and the Diagnosis of Moral Disorder (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003) and articles on family planning, medical mistakes, adolescent motherhood, and the sociology of pregnancy and birth. Her current research includes a longitudinal study of agenda setting around disease in the U.S. and a study of fetal personhood and obstetrical ethics. She holds a joint appointment in the department of sociology and the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University and is a faculty associate at both the Office of Population Research and the Center for Health and Wellbeing there.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Sharon H. Bzostek Ph.D.

Cohort 16 — Harvard Alumni List
Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology
Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ

Dr. Bzostek received her PhD in sociology from Princeton University in 2009. Her primary research interests are in the fields of family demography, childhood inequality, and health disparities. Current research projects include a study of differential self-rating of health by race/ethnicity, an analysis of child health disparities resulting from instability in family structure, a study of the patterns and consequences of health insurance coverage among children in the same family, and an investigation of differences in maternal and paternal reports of children’s health status.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Brian K. Finch Ph.D.

Cohort 7 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Research Professor of Sociology & Spatial Sciences
Director, Southern California Population Research Center
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

Dr. Finch received his PhD in Sociology from the University of Texas-Austin, a MA in Sociology from San Diego State University and his Bachelor of Arts degree in Peace and Conflict Studies from the University of California-Berkeley. Dr. Finch’s work crosses the disciplinary boundaries of social demography, social epidemiology and medical sociology to investigate the causes and correlates of population health disparities. Specifically, Finch analyzes socioeconomic and race/ethnic disparities in health outcomes and behaviors among adults and biological/social interactions across the early life course.
 

Discipline: Sociology
Health Policy Interests: Social Epidemiology
		

Kristen S. Harknett Ph.D.

Cohort 9 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Dr. Harknett received her PhD in Sociology and Demography from Princeton University in 2002. Her research is motivated by the sociological contention that a person's social environment influences his or her most personal and important decisions, sometimes in ways that may not be apparent to the individuals involved. She demonstrates this idea by studying the role of context – city of residence, school, or labor market – in shaping romantic relationships. Her research shows that male shortages and weak labor markets act as impediments to stable romantic relationships. One innovation in her research is to demonstrate that male shortages matter not only during the process of searching for a romantic partner, but they also influence the dynamics and trajectories of relationships that have already formed. In a second line of research, she investigates the importance of “private safety nets” comprised of supportive family members and friends. In this research, she examines how social support is unevenly distributed across individuals, and the consequences of lacking social support. Some of the topics she explores include the bi-directional relationship between fertility and social support, the correlation between personal and social network disadvantages, and the relationship between social support and psychological and material well-being.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Paula M. Lantz Ph.D.

Cohort 1 — Michigan Alumni List
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

Dr. Lantz received both her PhD in Sociology and her MA in Epidemiology from the University of Wisconsin. She also received her MA in Sociology from Washington University and her Bachelor of Arts degree from St. Olaf College. Dr. Lantz, a social demographer, studies the role of public health in health care reform, clinical preventive services (such as cancer screening and prenatal care), and social inequalities in health. She is particularly interested in the role of health care versus broad social policy aimed at social determinants of health in reducing social disparities in health status. She is currently doing research regarding the potential of social impact bonds to reduce Medicaid expenditures. Previously, she served an Associate Dean for Research and Policy Engagement and professor of public policy at the University of Michigan Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy. Prior to that, she acted as Professor and Chair of the Department of Health Policy at George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services, where she is also Professor of Public Policy.  She served as the Director of the Scholars in Health Policy Research Program at the University of Michigan site from 2002-2011.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Helen B. Marrow Ph.D.

Cohort 15 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
Tufts University, Medford, MA

Dr. Marrow received her PhD in Sociology and Social Policy from Harvard University in 2007.  She is co-editor of The New Americans: A Guide to Immigration since 1965 (Harvard University Press, 2007), and her other research has appeared in the American Sociological Review, Ethnicities, Ethnic and Racial Studies, and Perspectives on Politics.  While in the Program, Dr. Marrow completed a book entitled New Destination Dreaming:  Immigration, Race, and Legal Status in the Rural American South (2011, Stanford University Press).  She has also investigated safety-net primary healthcare providers’ experiences with and views about providing care to undocumented immigrants, in an effort to more deeply understand their roles as institutional agents of immigrant incorporation and exclusion. Dr. Marrow is an Associate Professor of Sociology at Tufts University.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Christine M. Percheski Ph.D.

Cohort 15 — Harvard Alumni List
Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology
Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

Dr. Percheski received her PhD in Sociology at Princeton University. Dr. Percheski's studies how recent and ongoing changes in family life are related to changing patterns of social inequality in the United States. Her previous work has considered questions such as whether becoming a father affects employment differently for married and unmarried men, how increases in family income inequality are related to increasing women's employment and single motherhood, how employment patterns have changed across birth cohorts of college-educated women in professional occupations, and how childhood family experiences are associated with non-marital births during early adulthood. Percheski has also examined the relationship between family characteristics and social inequality  in several domains including poverty risk during the recent recession, health insurance coverage for adults, and health care utilization among children. Dr. Percheski's current research portfolio includes an NSF-funded examination of wealth inequality in the United States. In collaboration with Christina Gibson-Davis, Percheski is assessing trends in the wealth of households with children relative to the elderly, variations in wealth by family structure, and racial gaps in wealth poverty.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Stephanie A. Robert Ph.D.

Cohort 3 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Professor, School of Social Work
University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI

Dr. Robert received her PhD in Social work from University of Michigan and her MSW from University of Michigan. Her research focuses on how social and economic aspects of people’s lives affect their health and well-being over the life course. She demonstrates how socioeconomic status and race affect health over the life course and into old age. Many of her publications focus on how neighborhood context affects the health of residents and contributes to health disparities. She is co-director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholars program, which trains postdoctoral researchers from a range of fields to conduct research on population health, and to translate that knowledge into practice and policy. One of her current research projects examines the general public’s views about health disparities by race, income, and education. She aims to see to what degree people recognize that health is affected by a range of factors, not just medical care and individual health behaviors. She examines the public’s willingness to consider new social and economic policy as mechanisms to improve physical health and reduce health disparities. Another current project examines the time use of older adults, examining racial and educational differences in time spent on caregiving and volunteer activities. Yet another project examines whether the social environment contributes to birth outcomes and racial disparities in birth outcomes in Wisconsin. Her ongoing research also examines multiple facets of neighborhood environments and how they can promote or inhibit health among residents, particularly older adults.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Quincy Thomas Stewart Ph.D.

Cohort 13 — Michigan Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
Faculty Fellow, Institute for Policy Research
Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

Dr. Stewart received his PhD in Demography and Sociology from the University of Pennsylvania, and his Bachelor of Science degree in Interdisciplinary Studies from Norfolk State Univeresity. He is interested in the dynamic processes that create inequalities in socioeconomic status, health and mortality. Stewart has published on quantitative methods for studying inequality, the estimation of mortality, and on racial and ethnic disparities in socioeconomic status, health and mortality. His current work includes: 1) analyzing racial inequality using agent-based models, 2) examining the role of disease prevalence in mortality outcomes, and 3) analyzing racial disparities in attitudes, socioeconomic status and health outcomes. Before joining Northwestern in 2011, Professor Stewart was on the faculty at Indiana University for 9 years as a member of the Department of Sociology.

Discipline: Sociology