Political Sociology

Christopher A. Bail Ph.D.

Cohort 18 — Michigan Alumni List
Douglas and Ellen Lowey Assistant Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology
Duke University, Durham, NC

Dr. Bail received his Ph.D. in Sociology from Harvard University in 2011. His primary interests include political and cultural sociology, civil society organizations, and mixed-method research. His  book entitled, Terrified: How Anti-Muslim Fringe Organizations Became Mainstream was published by Princeton University Press in 2015. While in the Program, he studied the role of emotions in health communication using an innovative research design that mines information about the behavior of hundreds of millions of people using a Facebook app. He is the Douglas and Ellen Lowey Assistant Professor of Sociology at Duke University.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Christopher J. Bonastia Ph.D.

Cohort 8 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
Lehman College and CUNY Graduate Center, Bronx, NY

Dr. Bonastia received his Ph.D. from New York University in 2001.  Dr. Bonastia’s work focuses on historical explorations of race, policy and politics.  His first book, Knocking on the Door: The Federal Government’s Attempt to Desegregate the Suburbs, was published in 2006 by Princeton University Press.  His recent book, Southern Stalemate: Five Years without Public Education in Prince Edward County, Virginia, was published in early 2012 by the University of Chicago Press.  The latter project was funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.  In summer 2011, he was a visiting fellow at the NEH Summer Institute for College and University Teachers at Harvard University.  His work has also been published in the Journal of Policy History (examining civil rights enforcement in health care), the Du Bois Review, Social Science History and Social Problems, among other publications.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Neal Caren Ph.D.

Cohort 12 — Michigan Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC

Dr. Caren received his PhD in Sociology from New York University, and a MA from New York University. His research interests center on the quantitative analysis of protest and social movements and the intersection of place and political action. He currently services as an editorial board member and book review editor for Social Forces.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Anthony S. Chen Ph.D.

Cohort 12 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology
Director of Undergraduate Studies
Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

Dr. Chen received his PhD in Sociology from University of California-Berkeley, where he was also a Soros Fellow. He received his Bachelor of Arts from Rice University. He is also Director of Undergraduate Studies at Northwestern University. He is interested in the political development of public policy in the United States from the New Deal, and he has special interests in civil rights, social policy, and business-government relations. He is the author of The Fifth Freedom (Princeton), which offers a new account of how and why affirmative action emerged in employment. In collaboration with Lisa M. Stulberg, he is completing a book on the origins and development of affirmative action in college admissions. His work has appeared in the American Journal of Sociology, Journal of American History, and Studies in American Political Development, among other outlets. Chen is co-editor of Studies in American Political Development. Before joining the faculty at Northwestern, Chen was on the faculty for eight years at the University of Michigan.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Cybelle Fox Ph.D.

Cohort 14 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA

Dr. Fox received her PhD in Sociology and Social Policy from Harvard University and her Bachelor of Arts degree in History and Economics from University of California, San Diego. Her main research interests are in race, immigration and the American welfare state. Most recently, she is the author of Three Worlds of Relief (Princeton University Press, 2012), which compares the incorporation of blacks, Mexicans, and European immigrants in the American welfare system from the Progressive Era to the New Deal.  Her work has appeared in the American Journal of Sociology, American Behavioral Scientist, Sociology of Education, Political Science Quarterly, and Sociological Methods and Research. She is also co-author of Rampage: The Social Roots of School Shootings (Basic Books, 2004).

Discipline: Sociology
		

Drew T. Halfmann Ph.D.

Cohort 8 — Michigan Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
University of California, Davis, Davis, CA

Dr. Halfmann received both his PhD and MA in Sociology from New York University in 2001, and his Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and Economics from the University of Wisconsin in 1990. His research focuses on social movements and the politics of health and social policy.  Professor Halfmann is the author of Doctors and Demonstrators: How Political Institutions Shape Abortion Law in the United States, Britain and Canada (University of Chicago Press, 2011), which won the 2012 Charles Tilly Best Book Award from the Section on Collective Behavior and Social Movements of the American Sociological Association. His research has appeared in the American Sociological Review, Social Problems, Mobilization, HEALTH, Studies in American Political Development, and the Journal of Policy History.  His current research is on the African-American struggle for health equality from Reconstruction to Obamacare.  He is a member of the Scholars Strategy Network and co-director of its Bay Area Regional Network. 

Discipline: Sociology
		

Catherine Lee Ph.D.

Cohort 10 — Michigan Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ

Dr. Lee received her PhD in Sociology from the University of California, Los Angeles. She examines how meanings of race and ethnicity shape social relations and inequalities across three critical sites: immigration; science and medicine; and law and society. Catherine is the author of Fictive Kinship: Family Reunification and the Meaning of Race and Nation in American Immigration (2013, Russell Sage) and co-editor of Genetics and the Unsettled Past: The Collision of DNA, Race, and History (2012, Rutgers University Press). Her current projects include an investigation of racial disparities in pain management and the politics of narcotics control and a study of how social institutions are addressing ideas of racial ambiguity or uncertainty tied to shifting demographics and rise of multi-raciality.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Aaron Panofsky Ph.D.

Cohort 13 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor of Public Policy, UCLA School of Public Affairs and Center for Society and Genetics
University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA

Dr. Panofsky received his PhD in Sociology from New York University in 2006. Dr. Panofsky is a specialist in the sociology of science and knowledge and is interested in ways that biological and genetic knowledge are intersecting domains of social and health policy. His recent book Misbehaving Science: Controversy and the Development of Behavior Genetics (Chicago, 2014) is a historical account of the causes and consequences of controversy in the field of behavioral genetics. His research on science, genetics, policy, and health activism has been published in diverse sources including Annual Review of Genetics, Social Studies of Science, Policy and Society, Genome Medicine, and Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology

Discipline: Sociology
		

Robin H. Rogers Ph.D.

Cohort 5 — Yale Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
The City University of New York
Queens College and the CUNY Graduate Center, Flushing, NY

Dr. Rogers received her PhD. Her research interests have included: the genesis, institutional framework, implementation, and social contexts of social policy; welfare policy; faith-based policy initiatives; the role of religion in primary elections; flaws and techniques in quantitative and qualitative sociological research methods; and the adaptation of business models in the nonprofit sector. She is currently at work on a new book about the burgeoning role of billionaire philanthropy in shaping public policy. She is the author of The Welfare Experiments: Politics and Policy Evaluation (Stanford University Press, 2004) in addition to numerous articles on politics and social policy. Rogers has served as a Congressional Fellow on Women and Public Policy, and a visiting fellow at Princeton University. She is a recipient of the President’s Award for Excellence in Teaching.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Abigail C. Saguy Ph.D.

Cohort 7 — Yale Alumni List
Professor, Department of Sociology
Associate Professor, Department of Women’s Studies
University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA

Dr. Saguy received both her PhD and MA in Sociology from Princeton University and her Bachelor of Arts degree from College of Letters, Wesleyan Univeresity. My teaching and research interests include gender, culture, the body, politics, law and public health. Her interest also include in how cultural schemas shape power relations and how subordinate groups are sometimes able to create new cultural meaning to increase their control. She pursued these interests through my comparative research on sexual harassment definitions and on framing contests over fatness. In these “hot” or highly contested topics, social actors make their cultural assumptions explicit, making them ideally suited to cultural analysis. In her work, she used multiple methods and cross-national, cross-issue, and cross-institutional comparisons. In recent years, the “obesity epidemic” has emerged as a top public health concern in the United States and abroad. Scholars, journalists, and politicians alike are scrambling to find answers. What or who is responsible for this crisis and what can be done to stop it? In contrast, in What's Wrong with Fat? (WWwF?) She argues that these fraught debates obscure more important sociological questions: How has fatness come to be understood as a public health crisis at all? Why has the view of fatness as a medical problem and public health crisis come to dominate more positive framings of weight – as consistent with health, beauty, or a legitimate rights claim—in public discourse? Why are heavy individuals singled out for blame? And what are the consequences of understanding weight in these ways? Building on WWwF?, she conducted a series of ongoing experments with David Frederick (Psychology, Chapman University) that examine the effect of reading different news articles about body weight have on attitudes about health, health policy, and weight-based prejudice. In a collaboration with French sociologists Henri Bergeron and Patrick Castell, she is investigating the extent to which frames shape policy, focusing specifically on the case of French obesity policy. Her latest book is "What's Wrong with Fat? (2013, Oxford University Press) and What is Sexual Harassment? From Capitol Hill to the Sorbonne (2003, University of California Press).

Discipline: Sociology