Medical Sociology - Community context and health

Karen R. Albright Ph.D.

Cohort 11 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology and Criminology, Affiliated Faculty in the Graduate School of Social Work
University of Denver, Denver, CO

Dr. Albright received her PhD in Sociology from New York University. Dr. Albright’s research interests focus on health behaviors among socioeconomically disadvantaged populations, the barriers to their care, and potential solutions for improving care (e.g., collaborations between public health entities and private practices). In recent years, she has become particularly interested in how distrust of pharmaceutical medicine and the U.S. health care system affects health behaviors and outcomes. Dr. Albright’s research has been published in a wide variety of social scientific and medical journals, including American Journal of Public Health, Academic Pediatrics, Sociological Forum, and American Behavioral Scientist. Her research has been funded by, among others, the National Institutes of Health, the Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute, and the National Science Foundation. She is the Vice-President Elect of the Association for Applied and Clinical Sociology. 

Discipline: Sociology
		

Colin Jerolmack Ph.D.

Cohort 15 — Harvard Alumni List
Associate Professor of Sociology and Environmental Studies, Department of Sociology
Department Chair of Environmental Studies
New York University, New York, NY

Dr. Jerolmack received his PhD and MA in Sociology from City University of New York. He received his Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology from Drexel University. His primary fields of research are urban communities and environmental sociology.  His other research interests are Ethnography; urban communities; environmental sociology; animals and society; culture; health; social theory.  He also launched a community study of how climate change is threatening the livelihood of the native Inupiat people in Northwest Alaska.

Dr. Jerolmack's latest books are "Approaches to Ethnography from Oxford University Press" and "The Global Pigeon", University of Chicago Press. His co-authored publications include: Jerolmack, Colin and Nina Berman. 2016. "Fracking Communities." Public Culture 28(2), Jerolmack, Colin and Shamus Khan. 2014. "Talk is Cheap: Ethnography and the Attitudinal Fallacy." Sociological Methods and Research 43(2): 178-209, Jerolmack, Colin and Iddo Tavory. 2014. "Molds and Totems: Nonhumans and the Constitution of the Social Self." Sociological Theory 32(1): 64-77, Jerolmack, Colin.  2007.  "Animal Practices, Ethnicity and Community: The Turkish Pigeon Handlers of Berlin."  American Sociological Review 72(6): 874.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Stephanie A. Robert Ph.D.

Cohort 3 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Professor, School of Social Work
University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI

Dr. Robert received her PhD in Social work from University of Michigan and her MSW from University of Michigan. Her research focuses on how social and economic aspects of people’s lives affect their health and well-being over the life course. She demonstrates how socioeconomic status and race affect health over the life course and into old age. Many of her publications focus on how neighborhood context affects the health of residents and contributes to health disparities. She is co-director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholars program, which trains postdoctoral researchers from a range of fields to conduct research on population health, and to translate that knowledge into practice and policy. One of her current research projects examines the general public’s views about health disparities by race, income, and education. She aims to see to what degree people recognize that health is affected by a range of factors, not just medical care and individual health behaviors. She examines the public’s willingness to consider new social and economic policy as mechanisms to improve physical health and reduce health disparities. Another current project examines the time use of older adults, examining racial and educational differences in time spent on caregiving and volunteer activities. Yet another project examines whether the social environment contributes to birth outcomes and racial disparities in birth outcomes in Wisconsin. Her ongoing research also examines multiple facets of neighborhood environments and how they can promote or inhibit health among residents, particularly older adults.

Discipline: Sociology