Collective Behavior and Social Movements - Social movements

Christopher J. Bonastia Ph.D.

Cohort 8 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
Lehman College and CUNY Graduate Center, Bronx, NY

Dr. Bonastia received his Ph.D. from New York University in 2001.  Dr. Bonastia’s work focuses on historical explorations of race, policy and politics.  His first book, Knocking on the Door: The Federal Government’s Attempt to Desegregate the Suburbs, was published in 2006 by Princeton University Press.  His recent book, Southern Stalemate: Five Years without Public Education in Prince Edward County, Virginia, was published in early 2012 by the University of Chicago Press.  The latter project was funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.  In summer 2011, he was a visiting fellow at the NEH Summer Institute for College and University Teachers at Harvard University.  His work has also been published in the Journal of Policy History (examining civil rights enforcement in health care), the Du Bois Review, Social Science History and Social Problems, among other publications.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Drew T. Halfmann Ph.D.

Cohort 8 — Michigan Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
University of California, Davis, Davis, CA

Dr. Halfmann received both his PhD and MA in Sociology from New York University in 2001, and his Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and Economics from the University of Wisconsin in 1990. His research focuses on social movements and the politics of health and social policy.  Professor Halfmann is the author of Doctors and Demonstrators: How Political Institutions Shape Abortion Law in the United States, Britain and Canada (University of Chicago Press, 2011), which won the 2012 Charles Tilly Best Book Award from the Section on Collective Behavior and Social Movements of the American Sociological Association. His research has appeared in the American Sociological Review, Social Problems, Mobilization, HEALTH, Studies in American Political Development, and the Journal of Policy History.  His current research is on the African-American struggle for health equality from Reconstruction to Obamacare.  He is a member of the Scholars Strategy Network and co-director of its Bay Area Regional Network. 

Discipline: Sociology
		

Maren E. Klawiter J.D., Ph.D.

Cohort 6 — Michigan Alumni List
Staff Attorney / Connecticut Legal Services - New London Office, K-12 Education Law and Family/Domestic Violence
New London, CT

Dr. Klawiter received her JD from Yale Law School in 2010, received both her PhD and her MA in Sociology from University of California, Berkeley and her Bachelor of Arts degree from Bryn Mawr College. Dr. Klawiter is a dynamic attorney, sociologist and former educator with sound judgment, stellar credentials, and wide-ranging experience in higher education, government and internal investigations, civil litigation, criminal law, and school disciplinary proceedings. She is a former prosecutor in child abuse unit. Versatile and agile professional with demonstrated ability to manage complex projects, cultivate collaborative relationships, and work effectively with diverse groups and individuals. Strong communicator. Creative problem solver. Skilled interviewer and investigator. Knowledge of Title IX and related laws. She was admitted in CT and MA bar associations. She is also a former university professor with significant research, professional service, and teaching experience in medical sociology, health policy, health advocacy, and interdisciplinary studies of science, medicine and technology.

Discipline: Sociology
Health Policy Interests:
		

Deborah L. Little J.D., Ph.D.

Cohort 8 — Michigan Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology & Sociology
Adelphi University, Garden City, NY

Dr. Little receiver her PhD Sociology, University of California Berkeley (2001), her JD Magna Cum Laude, Georgetown University Law Center (1981) and her M.A. Sociology, University of California Berkeley (1989). Her research interests are Carework, disability, social movements. Her latest publications are: "Building a Movement of Caring Selves: Organizing Direct Care Workers." In Mignon Duffy, Amy Armenia, Clare L. Stacey (Eds.). Caring on the Clock: The Complexities and Contradictions of Paid Work. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press. (2015), "Sit Home and Collect the Check": Race, Class, and the Social Construction of Disability Identity. In Barnartt, Sharon N. (Eds.). Disability as a Fluid State. (pp. 183-202). Bingley: Emerald Group. (2010), "Teaching toward Praxis and Political Engagement. In David Fasenfest (Eds.). Engaging Social Justice: Critical Studies of 21st Century Social Transformation." Leiden: Brill. (2009) and "From 'Giving Care' to 'Taking Care': Negotiating Care-Work at Welfare's End." In Maurice Hamington and Dorothy C. Miller (Eds.). Socializing Care: Feminist Ethics and Public Issues (Feminist Constructions Series). (pp. 121-141). Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield. (2007)

Discipline: Sociology
		

Abigail C. Saguy Ph.D.

Cohort 7 — Yale Alumni List
Professor, Department of Sociology
Associate Professor, Department of Women’s Studies
University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA

Dr. Saguy received both her PhD and MA in Sociology from Princeton University and her Bachelor of Arts degree from College of Letters, Wesleyan Univeresity. My teaching and research interests include gender, culture, the body, politics, law and public health. Her interest also include in how cultural schemas shape power relations and how subordinate groups are sometimes able to create new cultural meaning to increase their control. She pursued these interests through my comparative research on sexual harassment definitions and on framing contests over fatness. In these “hot” or highly contested topics, social actors make their cultural assumptions explicit, making them ideally suited to cultural analysis. In her work, she used multiple methods and cross-national, cross-issue, and cross-institutional comparisons. In recent years, the “obesity epidemic” has emerged as a top public health concern in the United States and abroad. Scholars, journalists, and politicians alike are scrambling to find answers. What or who is responsible for this crisis and what can be done to stop it? In contrast, in What's Wrong with Fat? (WWwF?) She argues that these fraught debates obscure more important sociological questions: How has fatness come to be understood as a public health crisis at all? Why has the view of fatness as a medical problem and public health crisis come to dominate more positive framings of weight – as consistent with health, beauty, or a legitimate rights claim—in public discourse? Why are heavy individuals singled out for blame? And what are the consequences of understanding weight in these ways? Building on WWwF?, she conducted a series of ongoing experments with David Frederick (Psychology, Chapman University) that examine the effect of reading different news articles about body weight have on attitudes about health, health policy, and weight-based prejudice. In a collaboration with French sociologists Henri Bergeron and Patrick Castell, she is investigating the extent to which frames shape policy, focusing specifically on the case of French obesity policy. Her latest book is "What's Wrong with Fat? (2013, Oxford University Press) and What is Sexual Harassment? From Capitol Hill to the Sorbonne (2003, University of California Press).

Discipline: Sociology