Race and Politics

Cathy J. Cohen Ph.D.

Cohort 3 — Yale Alumni List
David and Mary Wilson Green Professor, Department of Political Science
University of Chicago, Chicago, IL

Dr. Cohen also served as the Deputy Provost for Graduate Education and is the former Director of the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture at the University of Chicago. Cohen is the author of two books: Democracy Remixed: Black Youth and the Future of American Politics (Oxford University Press 2010) and The Boundaries of Blackness: AIDS and the Breakdown of Black Politics (University of Chicago Press 1999) and co-editor with Kathleen Jones and Joan Tronto of Women Transforming Politics: An Alternative Reader (NYU, 1997). Her work has been published in numerous journals and edited volumes including the American Political Science Review, GLQ, NOMOS, and Social Text. Cohen is principal investigator of two major projects: The Black Youth Project and the Mobilization, Change and Political and Civic Engagement Project. Her general field of specialization is American politics, although her research interests include African-American politics, women and politics, lesbian and gay politics, and social movements.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Laura E. Evans Ph.D.

Cohort 14 — Harvard Alumni List
Associate Professor of Public Affairs, Daniel J. Evans School of Public Affairs
University of Washington, Seattle, WA

Dr. Evans received her PhD in Political Science from the University of Michigan. Dr. Evans joined the Evans School faculty in 2004. She studies the politics of American federalism. Dr. Evans explores the determinants of regional policy coordination and competition, with particular attention to institutional arrangements and racial and economic inequality. Her recent book, Power from Powerlessness: Tribal Governments, Institutional Niches, and American Federalism (2011, Oxford University Press), examines American Indian tribal governments’ relations with states, localities, and the federal government. Dr. Evans shows how American Indian tribal governments sometimes succeed, often against dim odds, in persuading state and local governments to address important tribal concerns. She shows that even when opportunities for major federal policy change are limited, tribes have built particular types of supportive relationships—which she terms institutional niches—that help with cultivating political capacity. She offers new ideas about the interplay of political institutions and the politics of marginalized groups. Dr. Evans is writing a book on agenda-setting in suburbs, tentatively titled, Ailing Agendas, Fractured Frames? Understanding the Politics of (In)Equality in America’s Suburbs.  She evaluates the frames that suburban officials deploy to justify policies of exclusion, efficiency, or equity. She identifies uniquely suburban frames and agendas and their ramifications for American politics. In several other articles, she has analyzed how state legislatures govern local affairs. Also, she has begun new work on institutional change in federal Indian policy over the 20th century.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Vincent L. Hutchings Ph.D.

Cohort 7 — Yale Alumni List
Professor, Department of Political Science
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

Dr. Hutchings received both his PhD and MA in Political Science from the University of California, Los Angeles and his Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science from San Jose State University. Dr. Hutchings interests include public opinion, elections, voting behavior, and African American politics. He recently published a book at Princeton University Press entitled Public Opinion and Democratic Accountability: How Citizens Learn About Politics, that focuses on how, and under what circumstances, citizens monitor (and consequently influence) their elected representative's voting behavior. In addition to this project, Professor Hutchings also studies how the size of the African American constituency in congressional districts can influence legislative responsiveness to Black interests. The most recent product of this research was published in the Journal of Politics. Finally, he is also interested in the ways that campaign communications can "prime" various group identities and subsequently affect candidate evaluations. This study examines how campaign communications can subtly---and not so subtly---prime voter's racial (and other group-based) attitudes and subsequently affect their political decisions. Research from this project, co-authored with Professor Nicholas Valentino and Ismail White, has been published in the American Political Science Review. Professor Hutchings, and collaborators Ashley Jardina, Rob Mickey, and Hanes Walton, are currently exploring how different news frames can diminish or exacerbate tensions among Whites, Blacks and Latinos. Professor Hutchings received multiple grants from the National Science Foundation, most recently (2009) for his project entitled “Elite Communications and Racial Group Conflict in the 21st Century.” He is currently the University of Michigan Principal Investigator for the American National Election Study for the 2012 election cycle.

 

Discipline: Political Science
		

Taeku Lee Ph.D.

Cohort 6 — Yale Alumni List
Professor of Political Science and Law, Department of Political Science
University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA

Dr. Lee received his PhD from the University of Chicago and his AB and MPP from Harvard University. Lee is also Associate Director of the Haas Institute at Berkeley, Managing Director of Asian American Decisions, and Co-Principal Investigator of the National Asian American Survey. Lee is currently Treasurer and on the Executive Council for the American Political Science Association and serves on the Board of Overseers of the American National Election Studies and the General Social Survey, and on the National Advisory Committee for the U.S. Census Bureau.

His book, Mobilizing Public Opinion (2002), received the American Political Science Association’s J. David Greenstone Award and the Southern Political Science Association’s V.O. Key Award. His also co-editor of Transforming Politics, Transforming America (2006) on immigrant political incorporation and co-author of the just-finished Race, Immigration, and (Non)Partisanship in America.  Currently, he is co-editing the Oxford Handbook of Racial and Ethnic Politics in the United States and co-editing a volume for the World Bank titled Voice with Teeth: Public Opinion and Accountability.  Lee is also embarking on two new books: a collection of essays tentatively titled "Race, Identity, Power, and Method", a volume for the Russell Sage Foundation based on the 2008 National Asian American Survey (co-authored with his co-Principal Investigators on that project).  At Berkeley, Lee was previously the Director of the IGS Center on the Politics of Immigration, Race, and Ethnicity, chair of the Diversity and Democracy Cluster of the Berkeley Diversity Research Initiative, and Senior Faculty Fellow at the Chief Justice Earl Warren Institute for Race, Ethnicity, and Diversity. Prior to coming to Berkeley, Lee was Assistant Professor at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. He was also previously Assistant Professor of Public Policy at Harvard, Fernand Braudel Senior Fellow at the European University Institute, and Non-Resident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Monique L. Lyle Ph.D.

Cohort 15 — Michigan Alumni List
Assistant Professor, Institute for Public Service and Policy Research
Executive Director of the Survey Research Laboratory in the Institute for Public Service and Policy Research
University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC

Dr. Lyle received her PhD in Political Science from Duke University. She has expertise in the areas of public opinion, political psychology, and race in American politics. Her research examines the influence of political elites on attitudes about marginalized groups, as well as the interface between politics and health attitudes and behaviors (especially in the areas of mental health and obesity). Dr. Lyle is also a former Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Scholar in Health Policy Research (University of Michigan, 2008-2010). Some of her research publications appear in the Journal of Politics, Du Bois Review, Politics, Groups, & Identities, the Journal of Experimental Political Science, and Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Eric L. McDaniel Ph.D.

Cohort 15 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Government
University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX

Dr. McDaniel holds a PhD in Political Science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Dr. McDaniel specializes in American politics. His research areas include religion and politics, Black politics, and organizational behavior. His research focuses on religion and politics, and racial and ethnic politics. He is particularly interested in the role of Black religious institutions in shaping Black political behavior. His recent book, Politics in the Pews: The Political Mobilization of Black Churches (2008), examines the determinants of Black church political engagement. He is currently working on projects that examine the political consequences of differing religious interpretations and how people define citizenship. His project while in the Program examined how religious interpretation influences attitudes towards health care policy.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Jamila Michener Ph.D.

Cohort 18 — Michigan Alumni List
Assistant Professor, Department of Government
Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

Dr. Michener received her PhD in Political Science from the University of Michigan. She is interested in race and public policy in the United States. Her research has been supported by the Russell Sage Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Ford Foundation.

Her research aims to identify: 1) the conditions under which economically and racially marginalized groups engage in the political process and 2) the many ways public policy shapes the lives of people in these groups. Particular topics that animate this agenda include: the political causes of racial disparities in poverty rates; the effects of state policies on the political behavior of people living in poverty; the relationship between neighborhood disorder and local political participation; the determinants of state compliance with the public assistance provisions (section 7) of the National Voter Registration Act; and the community level political effects of concentrated disadvantage.

Her academic work has been published or is forthcoming in Political Behavior, the Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law, Poverty and Public Policy and the Forum. Dr. Michener's (forthcoming) book with Cambridge University Press is entitled, Fragmented Democracy: Medicaid, Federalism, and Unequal Politics. Her public writing has been featured in the New York Times, the Washington Post and the American Prospect.

In addition to writing and research, she is a co-leader of the Finger Lakes Branch of the Scholars Strategy Network, a faculty affiliate at the Center for the Study of Inequality, a graduate field faculty member in the Africana Studies Department, a faculty affiliate in the American Studies Program and an affiliate at the Cornell Population Center. She also sits on the advisory board of the Cornell Prison Education Program and teach classes in local prisons.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Naomi Murakawa Ph.D.

Cohort 13 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of African American Studies
Princeton University, Princeton, NJ

Dr. Murakawa received her PhD in Economics from Yale University, her MSc in Social Policy from London School of Economics and her Bachelor of Arts degree in Women Studies from Columbia University. Dr. Murakawa studies the reproduction of racial inequality in 20th and 21st century American politics, with specialization in crime policy and the carceral state. She is the author of The First Civil Right: How Liberals Built Prison America (Oxford University Press, 2014), and her work has appeared in Law & Society Review, Theoretical Criminology, Du Bois Review, and several edited volumes. She has received a fellowship from Columbia Law School’s Center for the Study of Law and Culture.

Discipline: Political Science
		

J. Eric Oliver Ph.D.

Cohort 6 — Yale Alumni List
Professor, Department of Political Science
University of Chicago, Chicago, IL

Dr. Oliver is Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago. His interests include contemporary American politics, suburban and racial politics, political psychology, and the politics of science. His books include Democracy in Suburbia, Fat Politics: the Real Story Behind America's Obesity Epidemic, The Paradoxes of Integration, and Local Elections and the Politics of Small Scale Democracy. He has also authored articles in the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Perspectives in Biology and Medicine, International Journal of Epidemiology, and Urban Affairs Review on topics ranging from absentee voting to happiness in suburbs. He has been a visiting scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation and received a Young Investigators Career Award from the National Science Foundation. He is currently working on research about the evolutionary origins of contemporary political cognition.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Christopher S. Parker Ph.D.

Cohort 12 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Stuart A. Scheingold Professor of Social Justice and Political Science, Department of Political Science
University of Washington, Seattle, WA

Dr. Parker received his PhD from University of Chicago and his Bachelor of Arts degree from University of California, Los Angeles. Dr. Parker's research takes a behavioral approach to historical events. More specifically, he brings survey data to bear on questions of historical import. His first book, Fighting for Democracy: Black Veterans and the Struggle Against White Supremacy in the
Postwar South (Princeton University Press, 2009), takes a fresh approach to the civil rights movement by gauging the extent to which black veterans contributed to social change. A second book, now underway and using data collected in 1968, examines the ideological and sociological origins of what has come to be known as the urban crisis of the 1960s. In short, it examines the micro-foundations of the disturbances that swept America in the late 1960s. A Robert Wood Johnson Scholar (2005-07), he has published in the Journal of Politics, International Security, Political Research Quarterly, and the Du Bois Review.  

His publications include: "Change They Can’t Believe In: The Tea Party and Reactionary Politics in Contemporary America. Princeton University Press, 2013, "Fighting for Democracy: Black Veterans and the Struggle Against White Supremacy in the Postwar South. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2009, “A Subjective Assessment of Veterans Health Care: From the Veteran's Point of View,” in The Politics of Veterans’ Policy: Federal Policy in the Modern United States, edited by Stephen Ortiz. University of Florida Press, 2012,“War and African American Citizenship, 1865-1965: The Role of Military Service,” In The Handbook of African American Citizenship 1865-Present, edited by Henry Louis Gates, jr., Claude Steele, Lawrence D. Bobo, Michael C. Dawson, Gerald Jaynes, Lisa Crooms-Robinson, and Linda Darling. Oxford University Press, 2012, “The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP),” and In The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Social and Political Movements, edited by David A. Snow, Donatella Della Porta, Bert Klandermans, and Doug McAdam. Blackwell Press, 2012.

Discipline: Political Science