Public Opinion - Public opinion & elections

Erika Franklin Fowler Ph.D.

Cohort 14 — Michigan Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Government
Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT

Dr. Fowler received a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Wisconsin – Madison.  Dr. Fowler’s dissertation provides one of the first systematic examinations of both the content and effect of local television news coverage of elections.  As a Scholar, she studied the emergence and evolution of competitive framing surrounding HPV-related policy action in local media and how publicized controversy may have shaped public decisions about and confidence in vaccination and immunization programs more generally. She also worked on another project examining variation in health news across outlets with a particular focus on whether media diminish or exacerbate existing inequalities. 

Discipline: Political Science
		

Shana K. Gadarian Ph.D.

Cohort 16 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, Maxwell School
Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY

Dr. Gadarian received a Ph.D. in political science from Princeton University in 2008. Her primary research interests include American politics, political psychology, and political communication. She is currently at work on a project entitled, Anxious Politics: Anxiety’s Role in Information Seeking, Trust, and Attitudes, joint with Bethany Albertson. The project explores how worries over public health, immigration, and terrorism shape how Americans seek political information, who they turn to in crises, and their political attitudes. As a Scholar, she explored how anxiety about health crises affects trust in government as well as how individuals deal with genetic risk.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Vincent L. Hutchings Ph.D.

Cohort 7 — Yale Alumni List
Professor, Department of Political Science
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

Dr. Hutchings received both his PhD and MA in Political Science from the University of California, Los Angeles and his Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science from San Jose State University. Dr. Hutchings interests include public opinion, elections, voting behavior, and African American politics. He recently published a book at Princeton University Press entitled Public Opinion and Democratic Accountability: How Citizens Learn About Politics, that focuses on how, and under what circumstances, citizens monitor (and consequently influence) their elected representative's voting behavior. In addition to this project, Professor Hutchings also studies how the size of the African American constituency in congressional districts can influence legislative responsiveness to Black interests. The most recent product of this research was published in the Journal of Politics. Finally, he is also interested in the ways that campaign communications can "prime" various group identities and subsequently affect candidate evaluations. This study examines how campaign communications can subtly---and not so subtly---prime voter's racial (and other group-based) attitudes and subsequently affect their political decisions. Research from this project, co-authored with Professor Nicholas Valentino and Ismail White, has been published in the American Political Science Review. Professor Hutchings, and collaborators Ashley Jardina, Rob Mickey, and Hanes Walton, are currently exploring how different news frames can diminish or exacerbate tensions among Whites, Blacks and Latinos. Professor Hutchings received multiple grants from the National Science Foundation, most recently (2009) for his project entitled “Elite Communications and Racial Group Conflict in the 21st Century.” He is currently the University of Michigan Principal Investigator for the American National Election Study for the 2012 election cycle.

 

Discipline: Political Science
		

Julia Lynch Ph.D.

Cohort 10 — Harvard Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Political Science
Senior Fellow, Leonard Davis Institute for Health Economics
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Dr. Lynch received her PhD in political science from the University of California, Berkeley and a BA in government from Harvard University.  Her research concerns the politics of inequality, social policy, and the economy in comparative perspective, with a focus on the countries of Western Europe and the United States.  At Penn, Lynch co-directs the Penn-Temple European Studies Colloquium, and is a faculty affiliate with the Penn-Wharton Public Policy Initiative, the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, the Lauder Institute and the Italian Studies Program.  Professor Lynch is also active in the profession more broadly, serving on the Executive Committee of the Council for European Studies as well as on the editorial boards of Comparative Political Studies, Journal of European Social Policy, and Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law. Lynch has received major grants and fellowships from the Mellon Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the National Science Foundation, and the Social Science Research Council.

Discipline: Political Science