Public Opinion

Jason Barabas Ph.D.

Cohort 11 — Harvard Alumni List
Professor, Department of Political Science
Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY

Dr. Barabas received his PhD is from Northwestern University. He has held postdoctoral fellowships at Harvard and Princeton. In his research, Professor Barabas blends interests in American politics--particularly representation and public opinion--with scholarship on public policy, political psychology, and methodology. A central question motivating him comes from democratic theory: do citizens get what they want from government? Consequently, most of his research emphasizes the public dimension of public policy. Sometimes he focuses on attitudes toward reforms for major programs like Social Security or Medicare. Other times he concentrates on how citizens learn about issues from each other or the mass media. Dr. Barabas studies public opinion with an eye toward what role citizens play in the policy process.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Erika Franklin Fowler Ph.D.

Cohort 14 — Michigan Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Government
Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT

Dr. Fowler received a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Wisconsin – Madison.  Dr. Fowler’s dissertation provides one of the first systematic examinations of both the content and effect of local television news coverage of elections.  As a Scholar, she studied the emergence and evolution of competitive framing surrounding HPV-related policy action in local media and how publicized controversy may have shaped public decisions about and confidence in vaccination and immunization programs more generally. She also worked on another project examining variation in health news across outlets with a particular focus on whether media diminish or exacerbate existing inequalities. 

Discipline: Political Science
		

Matthew J. Gabel Ph.D.

Cohort 3 — Michigan Alumni List
Professor, Department of Political Science
Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO

Dr. Gabel received his PhD in political science from the University of Rochester in 1994 and was member of the faculty of the University of Kentucky until 2005.  His research interests span comparative politics, international political economy, European politics, and medical decision making.  He is a founding co-editor of the journal European Union Politics and has published articles in theAmerican Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political Science, and the Journal of Politics.  His work on health policy has focused on theoretical and empirical issues of group decision making in consensus panels, which are used in the review of medical therapies and procedures as well as in medical diagnosis.  Publications of this work have appeared in the Journal of Health Economics and the Archives of Neurology.  He is currently consulting for Bristol-Myers-Squibb on a drug trial related to his research on the diagnosis of dementia.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Shana K. Gadarian Ph.D.

Cohort 16 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, Maxwell School
Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY

Dr. Gadarian received a Ph.D. in political science from Princeton University in 2008. Her primary research interests include American politics, political psychology, and political communication. She is currently at work on a project entitled, Anxious Politics: Anxiety’s Role in Information Seeking, Trust, and Attitudes, joint with Bethany Albertson. The project explores how worries over public health, immigration, and terrorism shape how Americans seek political information, who they turn to in crises, and their political attitudes. As a Scholar, she explored how anxiety about health crises affects trust in government as well as how individuals deal with genetic risk.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Vincent L. Hutchings Ph.D.

Cohort 7 — Yale Alumni List
Professor, Department of Political Science
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

Dr. Hutchings received both his PhD and MA in Political Science from the University of California, Los Angeles and his Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science from San Jose State University. Dr. Hutchings interests include public opinion, elections, voting behavior, and African American politics. He recently published a book at Princeton University Press entitled Public Opinion and Democratic Accountability: How Citizens Learn About Politics, that focuses on how, and under what circumstances, citizens monitor (and consequently influence) their elected representative's voting behavior. In addition to this project, Professor Hutchings also studies how the size of the African American constituency in congressional districts can influence legislative responsiveness to Black interests. The most recent product of this research was published in the Journal of Politics. Finally, he is also interested in the ways that campaign communications can "prime" various group identities and subsequently affect candidate evaluations. This study examines how campaign communications can subtly---and not so subtly---prime voter's racial (and other group-based) attitudes and subsequently affect their political decisions. Research from this project, co-authored with Professor Nicholas Valentino and Ismail White, has been published in the American Political Science Review. Professor Hutchings, and collaborators Ashley Jardina, Rob Mickey, and Hanes Walton, are currently exploring how different news frames can diminish or exacerbate tensions among Whites, Blacks and Latinos. Professor Hutchings received multiple grants from the National Science Foundation, most recently (2009) for his project entitled “Elite Communications and Racial Group Conflict in the 21st Century.” He is currently the University of Michigan Principal Investigator for the American National Election Study for the 2012 election cycle.

 

Discipline: Political Science
		

Taeku Lee Ph.D.

Cohort 6 — Yale Alumni List
Professor of Political Science and Law, Department of Political Science
University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA

Dr. Lee received his PhD from the University of Chicago and his AB and MPP from Harvard University. Lee is also Associate Director of the Haas Institute at Berkeley, Managing Director of Asian American Decisions, and Co-Principal Investigator of the National Asian American Survey. Lee is currently Treasurer and on the Executive Council for the American Political Science Association and serves on the Board of Overseers of the American National Election Studies and the General Social Survey, and on the National Advisory Committee for the U.S. Census Bureau.

His book, Mobilizing Public Opinion (2002), received the American Political Science Association’s J. David Greenstone Award and the Southern Political Science Association’s V.O. Key Award. His also co-editor of Transforming Politics, Transforming America (2006) on immigrant political incorporation and co-author of the just-finished Race, Immigration, and (Non)Partisanship in America.  Currently, he is co-editing the Oxford Handbook of Racial and Ethnic Politics in the United States and co-editing a volume for the World Bank titled Voice with Teeth: Public Opinion and Accountability.  Lee is also embarking on two new books: a collection of essays tentatively titled "Race, Identity, Power, and Method", a volume for the Russell Sage Foundation based on the 2008 National Asian American Survey (co-authored with his co-Principal Investigators on that project).  At Berkeley, Lee was previously the Director of the IGS Center on the Politics of Immigration, Race, and Ethnicity, chair of the Diversity and Democracy Cluster of the Berkeley Diversity Research Initiative, and Senior Faculty Fellow at the Chief Justice Earl Warren Institute for Race, Ethnicity, and Diversity. Prior to coming to Berkeley, Lee was Assistant Professor at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. He was also previously Assistant Professor of Public Policy at Harvard, Fernand Braudel Senior Fellow at the European University Institute, and Non-Resident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Monique L. Lyle Ph.D.

Cohort 15 — Michigan Alumni List
Assistant Professor, Institute for Public Service and Policy Research
Executive Director of the Survey Research Laboratory in the Institute for Public Service and Policy Research
University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC

Dr. Lyle received her PhD in Political Science from Duke University. She has expertise in the areas of public opinion, political psychology, and race in American politics. Her research examines the influence of political elites on attitudes about marginalized groups, as well as the interface between politics and health attitudes and behaviors (especially in the areas of mental health and obesity). Dr. Lyle is also a former Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Scholar in Health Policy Research (University of Michigan, 2008-2010). Some of her research publications appear in the Journal of Politics, Du Bois Review, Politics, Groups, & Identities, the Journal of Experimental Political Science, and Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Julia Lynch Ph.D.

Cohort 10 — Harvard Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Political Science
Senior Fellow, Leonard Davis Institute for Health Economics
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Dr. Lynch received her PhD in political science from the University of California, Berkeley and a BA in government from Harvard University.  Her research concerns the politics of inequality, social policy, and the economy in comparative perspective, with a focus on the countries of Western Europe and the United States.  At Penn, Lynch co-directs the Penn-Temple European Studies Colloquium, and is a faculty affiliate with the Penn-Wharton Public Policy Initiative, the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, the Lauder Institute and the Italian Studies Program.  Professor Lynch is also active in the profession more broadly, serving on the Executive Committee of the Council for European Studies as well as on the editorial boards of Comparative Political Studies, Journal of European Social Policy, and Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law. Lynch has received major grants and fellowships from the Mellon Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the National Science Foundation, and the Social Science Research Council.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Brendan Nyhan Ph.D.

Cohort 16 — Michigan Alumni List
Professor, Department of Government
Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH

Dr. Nyhan received his PhD in Political Science from Duke University. His research focuses on misperceptions about politics and health care, has been published in journals including the American Journal of Political Science, British Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, Medical Care, Pediatrics, Political Analysis, Political Behavior, Political Psychology, Social Networks, and Vaccine. He is a contributor to The Upshot at The New York Times (March 2014-) and a co-founder of Bright Line Watch (January 2017-). I previously served as a media critic for Columbia Journalism Review (November 2011-February 2014). He blogs on brendan-nyhan.com and tweet at @BrendanNyhan. He's called "one of the most thought-provoking writers about politics on the web", "[o]ne of the smartest sources on 2016, the media, and electoral trends", one of "a new breed of conscientious political science bloggers" who are "creating reputational hazards to seat-of-the-pants punditry," and a "political science shaolin warrior". From 2001-2004, Ben Fritz, Bryan Keefer, and he edited Spinsanity, a non-partisan watchdog of political spin that was syndicated in Salon (2002) and the Philadelphia Inquirer (2004). In 2004, we published All the President's Spin, a New York Times bestseller that Amazon.com named one of the ten best political books of the year. Previously, he was a marketing and fundraising consultant for Benetech, a Silicon Valley technology nonprofit, and Deputy Communications Director of the Bernstein for US Senate campaign in Nevada. His peer-reviewed publications forthcoming and/or are:

Fighting the Past: Perceptions of Control, Historical Misperceptions, and Corrective Information in the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict. Forthcoming, Political Psychology. Redefine Statistical Significance. Forthcoming, Nature Human Behavior. (with 71 co-authors), The Effects of Congressional Staff Networks in the U.S. House of Representatives (pre-publication version). 2017. Journal of Politics 79(3): 745-761. (with Jacob Montgomery) -Replication data and code (R/Matlab/Stata), Differential Registration Bias in Voter File Data: A Sensitivity Analysis Approach (pre-publication version). 2017. American Journal of Political Science 61(3): 744-760 (with Chris Skovron and Rocío Titiunik), -Replication data and code (R), Media Scandals Are Political Events: How contextual factors affect public controversies over alleged misconduct by U.S. governors (pre-publication version). 2017. Political Research Quarterly 70(1): 223-236, -Online appendix -Replication data and code (Stata),  The Nature and Origins of Misperceptions: Understanding False and Unsupported Beliefs about Politics (pre-publication version). 2017. Advances in Political Psychology 38(S1): 127-150. (with D.J. Flynn and Jason Reifler).

Discipline: Political Science
		

J. Eric Oliver Ph.D.

Cohort 6 — Yale Alumni List
Professor, Department of Political Science
University of Chicago, Chicago, IL

Dr. Oliver is Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago. His interests include contemporary American politics, suburban and racial politics, political psychology, and the politics of science. His books include Democracy in Suburbia, Fat Politics: the Real Story Behind America's Obesity Epidemic, The Paradoxes of Integration, and Local Elections and the Politics of Small Scale Democracy. He has also authored articles in the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Perspectives in Biology and Medicine, International Journal of Epidemiology, and Urban Affairs Review on topics ranging from absentee voting to happiness in suburbs. He has been a visiting scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation and received a Young Investigators Career Award from the National Science Foundation. He is currently working on research about the evolutionary origins of contemporary political cognition.

Discipline: Political Science