Political Behavior

Jake Bowers Ph.D.

Cohort 12 — Harvard Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Political Science
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL

Dr. Bowers received a B.A. from Yale University and an M. A. and Ph.D. from the University of California- Berkeley. Since 2015 he has worked as a Fellow with the Office of Evaluation Sciences, the behavioral insights unit of the U.S. Federal Government. Professor Bowers' research interests include political behavior (especially political participation) and quantitative methodology (especially randomized experiments, observational causal inference strategies and computational statistics).

Discipline: Political Science
		

Andrea Louise Campbell Ph.D.

Cohort 8 — Yale Alumni List
Arthur and Ruth Sloan Professor, Department of Political Science
Department Head
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA

Dr. Campbell received her PhD from University of California-Berkeley and her AB from Harvard University. Her research examines the interaction between public policies and mass attitudes and behavior, with a particular interest in the politics of social policy, health policy and tax policy. She is the author of How Policies Make Citizens: Senior Citizen Activism and the American Welfare State (Princeton, 2003) and, with Kimberly J. Morgan, The Delegated Welfare State: Medicare, Markets, and the Governance of Social Policy (Oxford, 2011). She is also completing a book manuscript on public opinion and taxes in the United States.  Campbell is a past Scholar in Health Policy Research (Cohort VIII) and recipient of a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Investigator Award. Other funders include the National Science Foundation and Russell Sage Foundation.  She is a member of the National Academy of Social Insurance and served on the National Academy of Sciences Commission on the Fiscal Future of the United States.

Discipline: Political Science
Research Interests: Political Behavior
		

Erika Franklin Fowler Ph.D.

Cohort 14 — Michigan Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Government
Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT

Dr. Fowler received a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Wisconsin – Madison.  Dr. Fowler’s dissertation provides one of the first systematic examinations of both the content and effect of local television news coverage of elections.  As a Scholar, she studied the emergence and evolution of competitive framing surrounding HPV-related policy action in local media and how publicized controversy may have shaped public decisions about and confidence in vaccination and immunization programs more generally. She also worked on another project examining variation in health news across outlets with a particular focus on whether media diminish or exacerbate existing inequalities. 

Discipline: Political Science
		

Shana K. Gadarian Ph.D.

Cohort 16 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, Maxwell School
Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY

Dr. Gadarian received a Ph.D. in political science from Princeton University in 2008. Her primary research interests include American politics, political psychology, and political communication. She is currently at work on a project entitled, Anxious Politics: Anxiety’s Role in Information Seeking, Trust, and Attitudes, joint with Bethany Albertson. The project explores how worries over public health, immigration, and terrorism shape how Americans seek political information, who they turn to in crises, and their political attitudes. As a Scholar, she explored how anxiety about health crises affects trust in government as well as how individuals deal with genetic risk.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Hahrie C. Han Ph.D.

Cohort 16 — Harvard Alumni List
Anton Vonk Professor of Political Science, Department of Political Science
University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA

Dr, Han received her PhD in Political Science from Stanford University in 2005. From 2005-2015, she was an Associate Professor of Political Science at Wellesley College. She specializes in the politics of environmental and social policy, focusing particularly on the role that civic associations play in mobilizing participation in politics and policy advocacy. Her recently published book, How Organizations Develop Activists: Civic Associations and Leadership in the 21st Century (Oxford University Press 2014) examines the strategies that the most effective civic associations use to engage activists and develop civic leaders in health and environmental politics. Another book, Groundbreakers: How Obama's 2.1 Million Activists Transformed Field Campaigns in America (co-authored with Elizabeth McKenna, Oxford Univ. Press 2014) describes the strategies the 2008 and 2012 Obama campaign used to engage so many grassroots activists in communities across America. Her first book, Moved to Action: Motivation, Participation, and Inequality in American Politics (Stanford University Press, 2009) examined the ways in which people become motivated to participate in politics, looking particularly at means of engaging underprivileged populations in political action. The book was the subject of a series of “Critical Dialogues” in Perspectives on Politics, an Author-Meets-Critics panel at the Southern Political Science Association, and positive reviews elsewhere.

Discipline: Political Science
		

John D. Huber Ph.D.

Cohort 1 — Michigan Alumni List
Professor, Department of Political Science
Columbia University, New York, NY

Dr. Huber received his both his PhD and MA in Political Science from the University of Rochester in 1991 and 1989 respectively. He received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Lawrence University in 1984. His research focuses on the comparative study of democratic processes.   He recently published Exclusion by Elections:  Inequality, Ethnic Identity and Democracy, which develops a theory about how inequality can foster identity politics, which can then limit the propensity of a democracy to respond to inequality. In addition to numerous articles, he previously  published Rationalizing Parliament: Legislative Institutions and Party Politics in France, and Deliberate Discretion? Institutional Foundations of Bureaucratic Autonomy (with Charles Shipan).  His  current projects focus on bureaucracy, civil war and inter-generational solidarity. Huber served as chair of the political science department from 2006-09 and 2010-13, and  was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2013.

Discipline: Political Science
Health Policy Interests: Medicaid
		

Debra Javeline Ph.D.

Cohort 10 — Harvard Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Political Science
University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN

Dr. Javeline received her PhD from Harvard University. Her research interests are Mass political behavior, survey research, Russian politics, sustainability, environmental politics, climate change. Dr. Javeline has conducted survey research in the former Soviet Union for the U.S. Information Agency (now State Department) and the U.S. Agency for International Development. She has held fellowships from Fulbright-Hays, Mellon, ACTR, FLAS, Harvard University's Davis Center for Russian Studies, the University of Colorado's Institute of Behavioral Science, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the National Science Foundation, and the National Council for Eurasian and East European Research. In 2011-12, she was supported by a Mellon New Directions fellowship to study ecology and environmental law.

Dr. Javeline divides her time between the study of Russia and the study of global environmental problems, especially climate change.  Her two current book projects are After Violence: The Beslan School Massacre and the Peace that Followed and Solutions: Science, Politics, and Saving the Planet.  She is also collaborating with Notre Dame engineers on a research project on “Coastal Homeownership in a Changing Climate: A Study of Risk Awareness, Risk Reduction, and Resilience.”  With scholars of environmental governance, she has planned a workshop for spring 2017 on “Adapting to Climate Change: Actions, Implementations, and Outcomes,” sponsored by the University of Notre Dame and the University of Washington.  With a Notre Dame undergraduate biologist, she is collaborating on a book chapter, “Adaptation of Ecosystems in the Anthropocene,” to be published in Research Handbook on Climate Change Adaptation Policy with Edward Elgar Publishing, and with other biologists, she continues to work on issues related to climate change and scientific opinion.  She and Sarah Lindemann-Komarova are updating their 2010 work in Journal of International Affairs for an article on "Civil Society in 'Putin's Russia.'"

Dr. Javeline's publications include Protest and the Politics of Blame: The Russian Response to Unpaid Wages (University of Michigan Press, 2003) and articles in The American Political Science Review, Comparative Political Studies, Political Research Quarterly,Public Opinion Quarterly, Law & Society Review, Problems of Post-Communism, Social Science & Medicine, Policy Sciences, and Bioscience. Recent articles are “The Most Important Topic Political Scientists are Not Studying: Adapting to Climate Change” (Perspectives on Politics, 2014) and “Expert Opinion on Extinction Risk and Climate Change Adaptation” (Elementa: Science for the Anthropocene, 2015).

 

Discipline: Political Science
Health Policy Interests:
		

Taeku Lee Ph.D.

Cohort 6 — Yale Alumni List
Professor of Political Science and Law, Department of Political Science
University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA

Dr. Lee received his PhD from the University of Chicago and his AB and MPP from Harvard University. Lee is also Associate Director of the Haas Institute at Berkeley, Managing Director of Asian American Decisions, and Co-Principal Investigator of the National Asian American Survey. Lee is currently Treasurer and on the Executive Council for the American Political Science Association and serves on the Board of Overseers of the American National Election Studies and the General Social Survey, and on the National Advisory Committee for the U.S. Census Bureau.

His book, Mobilizing Public Opinion (2002), received the American Political Science Association’s J. David Greenstone Award and the Southern Political Science Association’s V.O. Key Award. His also co-editor of Transforming Politics, Transforming America (2006) on immigrant political incorporation and co-author of the just-finished Race, Immigration, and (Non)Partisanship in America.  Currently, he is co-editing the Oxford Handbook of Racial and Ethnic Politics in the United States and co-editing a volume for the World Bank titled Voice with Teeth: Public Opinion and Accountability.  Lee is also embarking on two new books: a collection of essays tentatively titled "Race, Identity, Power, and Method", a volume for the Russell Sage Foundation based on the 2008 National Asian American Survey (co-authored with his co-Principal Investigators on that project).  At Berkeley, Lee was previously the Director of the IGS Center on the Politics of Immigration, Race, and Ethnicity, chair of the Diversity and Democracy Cluster of the Berkeley Diversity Research Initiative, and Senior Faculty Fellow at the Chief Justice Earl Warren Institute for Race, Ethnicity, and Diversity. Prior to coming to Berkeley, Lee was Assistant Professor at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. He was also previously Assistant Professor of Public Policy at Harvard, Fernand Braudel Senior Fellow at the European University Institute, and Non-Resident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Eric L. McDaniel Ph.D.

Cohort 15 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Government
University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX

Dr. McDaniel holds a PhD in Political Science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Dr. McDaniel specializes in American politics. His research areas include religion and politics, Black politics, and organizational behavior. His research focuses on religion and politics, and racial and ethnic politics. He is particularly interested in the role of Black religious institutions in shaping Black political behavior. His recent book, Politics in the Pews: The Political Mobilization of Black Churches (2008), examines the determinants of Black church political engagement. He is currently working on projects that examine the political consequences of differing religious interpretations and how people define citizenship. His project while in the Program examined how religious interpretation influences attitudes towards health care policy.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Jamila Michener Ph.D.

Cohort 18 — Michigan Alumni List
Assistant Professor, Department of Government
Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

Dr. Michener received her PhD in Political Science from the University of Michigan. She is interested in race and public policy in the United States. Her research has been supported by the Russell Sage Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Ford Foundation.

Her research aims to identify: 1) the conditions under which economically and racially marginalized groups engage in the political process and 2) the many ways public policy shapes the lives of people in these groups. Particular topics that animate this agenda include: the political causes of racial disparities in poverty rates; the effects of state policies on the political behavior of people living in poverty; the relationship between neighborhood disorder and local political participation; the determinants of state compliance with the public assistance provisions (section 7) of the National Voter Registration Act; and the community level political effects of concentrated disadvantage.

Her academic work has been published or is forthcoming in Political Behavior, the Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law, Poverty and Public Policy and the Forum. Dr. Michener's (forthcoming) book with Cambridge University Press is entitled, Fragmented Democracy: Medicaid, Federalism, and Unequal Politics. Her public writing has been featured in the New York Times, the Washington Post and the American Prospect.

In addition to writing and research, she is a co-leader of the Finger Lakes Branch of the Scholars Strategy Network, a faculty affiliate at the Center for the Study of Inequality, a graduate field faculty member in the Africana Studies Department, a faculty affiliate in the American Studies Program and an affiliate at the Cornell Population Center. She also sits on the advisory board of the Cornell Prison Education Program and teach classes in local prisons.

Discipline: Political Science