American Poltics - American political development

Jeb Barnes J.D., Ph.D.

Cohort 10 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Political Science
Director of Graduate Studies
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

Dr. Barnes received his PhD from the University of California-Berkeley, a J.D. Law degree from the University of Chicago, Law School and a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of California-Berkeley. His research generally focuses on the intersection between law, politics, and public policy and appears in a wide range of peer-reviewed journals, including thePolitical Research Quarterly, Law & Society Review, Law & Social Inquiry, Annual Review of Political Science, and Justice Systems Journal.  He has published two books: Overruled? Legislative Overrides, Pluralism, and Contemporary Court-Congress Relations (Stanford 2004) and a co-edited volume, Making Policy, Making Law: An Interbranch Perspective (Georgetown 2004).  He is currently finishing a short book on the recent failure of asbestos litigation reform in Congress, which is entitled Trying to Settle the Dust: Asbestos Litigation Reform and the Politics of Inefficiency in Contemporary American Politics.  His next project (with Thomas F. Burke, another Program alumnus) explores the political implications of relying on litigation versus social insurance programs to address injury compensation issues.  It is under contract with Oxford University Press.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Tim Bϋthe Ph.D.

Cohort 14 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Sanford School of Public Policy
Senior Fellow, Rethinking Regulation Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics
Duke University, Durham, NC

Dr. Buthe received his B.A. in Government, History, and Economics from Harvard in 1995, and his Ph.D. in Political Science from Columbia University in 2002.  His primary research interests are the evolution and persistence of institutions and the ways in which institutions enable and constrain actors.  Substantively, his work focuses primarily on the politics of standards & regulations and what he calls global private politics.  His work has been published in the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political ScienceGovernance, Law & Contemporary Problems, and other journals, as well as edited volumes (see www.buthe.info for details).  A major study of the domestic and international politics of setting standards for product and financial markets, including standards for medical instruments/devices, is forthcoming with Princeton University Press--based on multi-industry surveys in the U.S. and several European countries.  As a RWJF Scholar, he studied the standardization of medical terminology and the political contestation over the technology for electronic medical records, as well as the delegation of regulatory authority in the realm of food safety.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Robert Mickey Ph.D.

Cohort 13 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Political Science
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

Dr. Mickey received his PhD in political science at Harvard University. Dr. Mickey's research focuses on U.S. politics in historical perspective. He is interested in American political development, political parties, racial politics, and policy responses to inequality. His forthcoming book explores the post-war U.S. South as a set of transitions from authoritarian rule. Current projects concern racial politics in the urban North and West; racial appeals and the politics of symbols; race and national party alignment; and the politics of national health insurance. Dr. Mickey has taught undergraduate courses on the political development of the U.S. South in comparative perspective and directed the department's honors thesis program. At the graduate level, he has taught American Political Development; U.S. Parties; Regimes and Regime Change; and Causal Inference in Small-n Research (with Anna Grzymala-Busse). He has also coordinated the department's workshop on political institutions, and co-coordinated an interdisciplinary colloquium for graduate students on Race and 20th Century American Political Development.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Robert P. Saldin Ph.D.

Cohort 17 — Harvard Alumni List
Professor, Department of Political Science
University of Montana , Missoula, MT

Dr. Saldin holds a PhD in political science from the University of Virginia.  He is the author of War, the American State, and Politics since 1898 (Cambridge University Press, 2011), and his scholarly articles have appeared in venues such as The Journal of Politics, Journal of Policy History, and Political Research Quarterly.  As a Scholar, he studied long-term care’s policy history.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Adam D. Sheingate Ph.D.

Cohort 9 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Political Science
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD

Dr. Scheingate received both his PhD and MA in Political Science from Yale University. His research interest is American Politics. His most recent book is Building a Business of Politics: The Rise of Political Consulting and the Transformation of American Democracy. He is also a co-editor of the Oxford Handbook of Historical Institutionalism and the author of the Rise of the Agricultural Welfare State: Institutions and Interest Group Power in the United States, France, and Japan as well as journal articles and book chapters on American political development, historical institutionalism, and comparative public policy.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Patricia Strach Ph.D.

Cohort 15 — Harvard Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Political Science
University at Albany, SUNY, Albany, NY

Dr. Strach has a Ph.D. in political science from University of Wisconsin at Madison and is currently an associate professor in the departments of Political Science and Public Administration and Policy at the University at Albany, State University of New York. Her research examines the relationship between social and political institutions in American public policy. Previously, she mapped the role of family in the policy process and the consequences for policy when social practices changed over time. In the Program, she worked on a project that looks at when and why advocacy groups that wish to solve a social problem choose to turn to government (hence making public policy) and when and why they take alternative strategies (fundraising, marketing).

Discipline: Political Science