Urban Health and Health Care

Cathy J. Cohen Ph.D.

Cohort 3 — Yale Alumni List
David and Mary Wilson Green Professor, Department of Political Science
University of Chicago, Chicago, IL

Dr. Cohen also served as the Deputy Provost for Graduate Education and is the former Director of the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture at the University of Chicago. Cohen is the author of two books: Democracy Remixed: Black Youth and the Future of American Politics (Oxford University Press 2010) and The Boundaries of Blackness: AIDS and the Breakdown of Black Politics (University of Chicago Press 1999) and co-editor with Kathleen Jones and Joan Tronto of Women Transforming Politics: An Alternative Reader (NYU, 1997). Her work has been published in numerous journals and edited volumes including the American Political Science Review, GLQ, NOMOS, and Social Text. Cohen is principal investigator of two major projects: The Black Youth Project and the Mobilization, Change and Political and Civic Engagement Project. Her general field of specialization is American politics, although her research interests include African-American politics, women and politics, lesbian and gay politics, and social movements.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Ingrid Gould Ellen Ph.D.

Cohort 4 — Yale Alumni List
Paulette Goddard Professor of Urban Policy and Planning, Robert F. Wagner School of Public Service
Director, Furman Center for Real Estate and Urban Policy
New York University, New York, NY

Dr. Ellen received a PhD, MPP and an AB (in Applied Mathematics) from Harvard University. She joined the NYU Wagner faculty in the fall of 1997 and presently teaches courses in microeconomics, urban economics, and urban policy. Dr. Ellen's research interests center on housing and urban policy.  She is author of Sharing America's Neighborhoods: The Prospects for Stable Racial Integration (Harvard University Press, 2000) and has written numerous journal articles and book chapters related to housing policy, community development, and school and neighborhood segregation. Before coming to NYU, Dr. Ellen held visiting positions at the Urban Institute and the Brookings Institution.

Discipline: Economics
		

Nicole Esparza Ph.D.

Cohort 14 — Harvard Alumni List
Associate Professor of Public Affairs, Sol Price School of Public Policy
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

Dr. Esparza received her Ph.D. in sociology from Princeton University in 2007. Her research interests include organizational dynamics, urban inequality, and economic sociology.  Dr. Esparza's dissertation used a multi-method approach to examine nonprofit organizations in twenty-six U.S. metropolitan areas.  This research explored how inter-organizational dynamics and social and political context affect the distribution of homeless services.  As a Scholar, she studied hospital patient “dumping,” a practice in which hospitals avoid high-cost patients by refusing to admit, transferring, and/or releasing patients in unstable conditions.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Laura E. Evans Ph.D.

Cohort 14 — Harvard Alumni List
Associate Professor of Public Affairs, Daniel J. Evans School of Public Affairs
University of Washington, Seattle, WA

Dr. Evans received her PhD in Political Science from the University of Michigan. Dr. Evans joined the Evans School faculty in 2004. She studies the politics of American federalism. Dr. Evans explores the determinants of regional policy coordination and competition, with particular attention to institutional arrangements and racial and economic inequality. Her recent book, Power from Powerlessness: Tribal Governments, Institutional Niches, and American Federalism (2011, Oxford University Press), examines American Indian tribal governments’ relations with states, localities, and the federal government. Dr. Evans shows how American Indian tribal governments sometimes succeed, often against dim odds, in persuading state and local governments to address important tribal concerns. She shows that even when opportunities for major federal policy change are limited, tribes have built particular types of supportive relationships—which she terms institutional niches—that help with cultivating political capacity. She offers new ideas about the interplay of political institutions and the politics of marginalized groups. Dr. Evans is writing a book on agenda-setting in suburbs, tentatively titled, Ailing Agendas, Fractured Frames? Understanding the Politics of (In)Equality in America’s Suburbs.  She evaluates the frames that suburban officials deploy to justify policies of exclusion, efficiency, or equity. She identifies uniquely suburban frames and agendas and their ramifications for American politics. In several other articles, she has analyzed how state legislatures govern local affairs. Also, she has begun new work on institutional change in federal Indian policy over the 20th century.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Colin Jerolmack Ph.D.

Cohort 15 — Harvard Alumni List
Associate Professor of Sociology and Environmental Studies, Department of Sociology
Department Chair of Environmental Studies
New York University, New York, NY

Dr. Jerolmack received his PhD and MA in Sociology from City University of New York. He received his Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology from Drexel University. His primary fields of research are urban communities and environmental sociology.  His other research interests are Ethnography; urban communities; environmental sociology; animals and society; culture; health; social theory.  He also launched a community study of how climate change is threatening the livelihood of the native Inupiat people in Northwest Alaska.

Dr. Jerolmack's latest books are "Approaches to Ethnography from Oxford University Press" and "The Global Pigeon", University of Chicago Press. His co-authored publications include: Jerolmack, Colin and Nina Berman. 2016. "Fracking Communities." Public Culture 28(2), Jerolmack, Colin and Shamus Khan. 2014. "Talk is Cheap: Ethnography and the Attitudinal Fallacy." Sociological Methods and Research 43(2): 178-209, Jerolmack, Colin and Iddo Tavory. 2014. "Molds and Totems: Nonhumans and the Constitution of the Social Self." Sociological Theory 32(1): 64-77, Jerolmack, Colin.  2007.  "Animal Practices, Ethnicity and Community: The Turkish Pigeon Handlers of Berlin."  American Sociological Review 72(6): 874.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Jamila Michener Ph.D.

Cohort 18 — Michigan Alumni List
Assistant Professor, Department of Government
Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

Dr. Michener received her PhD in Political Science from the University of Michigan. She is interested in race and public policy in the United States. Her research has been supported by the Russell Sage Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Ford Foundation.

Her research aims to identify: 1) the conditions under which economically and racially marginalized groups engage in the political process and 2) the many ways public policy shapes the lives of people in these groups. Particular topics that animate this agenda include: the political causes of racial disparities in poverty rates; the effects of state policies on the political behavior of people living in poverty; the relationship between neighborhood disorder and local political participation; the determinants of state compliance with the public assistance provisions (section 7) of the National Voter Registration Act; and the community level political effects of concentrated disadvantage.

Her academic work has been published or is forthcoming in Political Behavior, the Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law, Poverty and Public Policy and the Forum. Dr. Michener's (forthcoming) book with Cambridge University Press is entitled, Fragmented Democracy: Medicaid, Federalism, and Unequal Politics. Her public writing has been featured in the New York Times, the Washington Post and the American Prospect.

In addition to writing and research, she is a co-leader of the Finger Lakes Branch of the Scholars Strategy Network, a faculty affiliate at the Center for the Study of Inequality, a graduate field faculty member in the Africana Studies Department, a faculty affiliate in the American Studies Program and an affiliate at the Cornell Population Center. She also sits on the advisory board of the Cornell Prison Education Program and teach classes in local prisons.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Robert Mickey Ph.D.

Cohort 13 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Political Science
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

Dr. Mickey received his PhD in political science at Harvard University. Dr. Mickey's research focuses on U.S. politics in historical perspective. He is interested in American political development, political parties, racial politics, and policy responses to inequality. His forthcoming book explores the post-war U.S. South as a set of transitions from authoritarian rule. Current projects concern racial politics in the urban North and West; racial appeals and the politics of symbols; race and national party alignment; and the politics of national health insurance. Dr. Mickey has taught undergraduate courses on the political development of the U.S. South in comparative perspective and directed the department's honors thesis program. At the graduate level, he has taught American Political Development; U.S. Parties; Regimes and Regime Change; and Causal Inference in Small-n Research (with Anna Grzymala-Busse). He has also coordinated the department's workshop on political institutions, and co-coordinated an interdisciplinary colloquium for graduate students on Race and 20th Century American Political Development.

Discipline: Political Science