Social Epidemiology

Jake Bowers Ph.D.

Cohort 12 — Harvard Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Political Science
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL

Dr. Bowers received a B.A. from Yale University and an M. A. and Ph.D. from the University of California- Berkeley. Since 2015 he has worked as a Fellow with the Office of Evaluation Sciences, the behavioral insights unit of the U.S. Federal Government. Professor Bowers' research interests include political behavior (especially political participation) and quantitative methodology (especially randomized experiments, observational causal inference strategies and computational statistics).

Discipline: Political Science
		

Damon Centola Ph.D.

Cohort 13 — Harvard Alumni List
Associate Professor and Director of Network Dynamics Group
Annenberg School for Communication
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Dr. Centola received his PhD in Sociology from Cornell University. He was an NSF IGERT Fellow in Non-linear Dynamics and Complex Systems.  He is currently a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University. Dr. Centola's work addresses the theory of how behaviors spread through social networks. His research uses computational models and online experiments to study innovation diffusion, social epidemiology and cultural evolution.  His papers have been published across several disciplines, including sociology, physics and public health, appearing in journals such as Science, the Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences, and the American Journal of Sociology. His work received the American Sociological Association’s Award for Outstanding Article in Mathematical Sociology in 2006, 2009, and 2011, and has garnered the ASA's Goodman Award for Outstanding Contributions to Sociological Methodology. He has developed new computational and experimental technologies, including the NetLogo Agent Based Modeling environment, and was awarded a U.S. Patent for inventing a method for building online networks to promote diffusion.  Recent popular accounts of Damon’s work have appeared in The New York Times, Wired, and CNN.  His research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the James S. McDonnell Foundation, and the Hewlett Foundation.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Dalton Conley Ph.D.

Cohort 3 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Henry Putnam University Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology
Princeton University, Princeton, NJ

Dr. Conley received his PhD in sociology from Columbia University in 1996 and a PhD in Biology (Genomics) from NYU in 2014. His research focuses on how socio-economic status and health are transmitted across generations and on the public policies that affect those processes. He studies sibling differences in socioeconomic success; racial inequalities; the measurement of class; and how health and biology affect (and are affected by) social position. His publications include Being Black, Living in the Red; The Starting GateHonky; The Pecking Order; You May Ask Yourself; and Parentology. He is a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and has been the recipient of Guggenheim, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Russell Sage Foundation fellowships as well as a CAREER award and the Alan T. Waterman Award of the National Science Foundation.

 

His current work applies econometric methods for causal inference--namely, a natural experiment framework--to genome-wide data available in social surveys to model gene-by-environment interaction effects.  Examples in this vein include deploying the Vietnam draft lottery, twin differences in birth weight, exogenous job loss (such as plant closure), and sibling differences in genotype (polygenic scores) to questions of health, development and socioeconomic attainment across the life course.  I am also interested in mapping the genetic architecture of phenotypic plasticity, interrogating the assumptions underlying models for heritability, and characterizing social and genetic sorting as distinct processes.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Brian K. Finch Ph.D.

Cohort 7 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Research Professor of Sociology & Spatial Sciences
Director, Southern California Population Research Center
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

Dr. Finch received his PhD in Sociology from the University of Texas-Austin, a MA in Sociology from San Diego State University and his Bachelor of Arts degree in Peace and Conflict Studies from the University of California-Berkeley. Dr. Finch’s work crosses the disciplinary boundaries of social demography, social epidemiology and medical sociology to investigate the causes and correlates of population health disparities. Specifically, Finch analyzes socioeconomic and race/ethnic disparities in health outcomes and behaviors among adults and biological/social interactions across the early life course.
 

Discipline: Sociology
Health Policy Interests: Social Epidemiology
		

Colin Jerolmack Ph.D.

Cohort 15 — Harvard Alumni List
Associate Professor of Sociology and Environmental Studies, Department of Sociology
Department Chair of Environmental Studies
New York University, New York, NY

Dr. Jerolmack received his PhD and MA in Sociology from City University of New York. He received his Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology from Drexel University. His primary fields of research are urban communities and environmental sociology.  His other research interests are Ethnography; urban communities; environmental sociology; animals and society; culture; health; social theory.  He also launched a community study of how climate change is threatening the livelihood of the native Inupiat people in Northwest Alaska.

Dr. Jerolmack's latest books are "Approaches to Ethnography from Oxford University Press" and "The Global Pigeon", University of Chicago Press. His co-authored publications include: Jerolmack, Colin and Nina Berman. 2016. "Fracking Communities." Public Culture 28(2), Jerolmack, Colin and Shamus Khan. 2014. "Talk is Cheap: Ethnography and the Attitudinal Fallacy." Sociological Methods and Research 43(2): 178-209, Jerolmack, Colin and Iddo Tavory. 2014. "Molds and Totems: Nonhumans and the Constitution of the Social Self." Sociological Theory 32(1): 64-77, Jerolmack, Colin.  2007.  "Animal Practices, Ethnicity and Community: The Turkish Pigeon Handlers of Berlin."  American Sociological Review 72(6): 874.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Anne Morrison Piehl Ph.D.

Cohort 4 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Professor, Department of Economics
Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ

Dr. Piehl received her PhD in Economics from Princeton University and her AB in Economics from Harvard University. She is also a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. She conducts research on the economics of crime and criminal justice, including sentencing and incarceration, homicide and other crimes, and the connections between immigration and crime.  Her research has been published in journals across several fields, including economics, law, population, and criminology. She is co-author, with Bert Useem, of Prison State: The Challenge of Mass Incarceration. Piehl is serving on the Committee on Law and Justice of the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences, and just concluded service on an ad-hoc panel that recently released the report of its work, The Growth of Incarceration in the United States.  Piehl has testified before the United States Sentencing Commission and the U.S. House of Representatives subcommittee on Immigration as well as work in Massachusetts and New Jersey on state corrections policy concerns.

Discipline: Economics