Race and Politics of Health Care

Christopher J. Bonastia (ext. site) Ph.D.

Cohort 8 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
Lehman College and CUNY Graduate Center, Bronx, NY

Dr. Bonastia received his Ph.D. from New York University in 2001.  Dr. Bonastia’s work focuses on historical explorations of race, policy and politics.  His first book, Knocking on the Door: The Federal Government’s Attempt to Desegregate the Suburbs, was published in 2006 by Princeton University Press.  His recent book, Southern Stalemate: Five Years without Public Education in Prince Edward County, Virginia, was published in early 2012 by the University of Chicago Press.  The latter project was funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.  In summer 2011, he was a visiting fellow at the NEH Summer Institute for College and University Teachers at Harvard University.  His work has also been published in the Journal of Policy History (examining civil rights enforcement in health care), the Du Bois Review, Social Science History and Social Problems, among other publications.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Neal Caren Ph.D.

Cohort 12 — Michigan Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC

Dr. Caren received his PhD in Sociology from New York University, and a MA from New York University. His research interests center on the quantitative analysis of protest and social movements and the intersection of place and political action. He currently services as an editorial board member and book review editor for Social Forces.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Cathy J. Cohen Ph.D.

Cohort 3 — Yale Alumni List
David and Mary Wilson Green Professor, Department of Political Science
University of Chicago, Chicago, IL

Dr. Cohen also served as the Deputy Provost for Graduate Education and is the former Director of the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture at the University of Chicago. Cohen is the author of two books: Democracy Remixed: Black Youth and the Future of American Politics (Oxford University Press 2010) and The Boundaries of Blackness: AIDS and the Breakdown of Black Politics (University of Chicago Press 1999) and co-editor with Kathleen Jones and Joan Tronto of Women Transforming Politics: An Alternative Reader (NYU, 1997). Her work has been published in numerous journals and edited volumes including the American Political Science Review, GLQ, NOMOS, and Social Text. Cohen is principal investigator of two major projects: The Black Youth Project and the Mobilization, Change and Political and Civic Engagement Project. Her general field of specialization is American politics, although her research interests include African-American politics, women and politics, lesbian and gay politics, and social movements.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Laura E. Evans Ph.D.

Cohort 14 — Harvard Alumni List
Associate Professor of Public Affairs, Daniel J. Evans School of Public Affairs
University of Washington, Seattle, WA

Dr. Evans received her PhD in Political Science from the University of Michigan. Dr. Evans joined the Evans School faculty in 2004. She studies the politics of American federalism. Dr. Evans explores the determinants of regional policy coordination and competition, with particular attention to institutional arrangements and racial and economic inequality. Her recent book, Power from Powerlessness: Tribal Governments, Institutional Niches, and American Federalism (2011, Oxford University Press), examines American Indian tribal governments’ relations with states, localities, and the federal government. Dr. Evans shows how American Indian tribal governments sometimes succeed, often against dim odds, in persuading state and local governments to address important tribal concerns. She shows that even when opportunities for major federal policy change are limited, tribes have built particular types of supportive relationships—which she terms institutional niches—that help with cultivating political capacity. She offers new ideas about the interplay of political institutions and the politics of marginalized groups. Dr. Evans is writing a book on agenda-setting in suburbs, tentatively titled, Ailing Agendas, Fractured Frames? Understanding the Politics of (In)Equality in America’s Suburbs.  She evaluates the frames that suburban officials deploy to justify policies of exclusion, efficiency, or equity. She identifies uniquely suburban frames and agendas and their ramifications for American politics. In several other articles, she has analyzed how state legislatures govern local affairs. Also, she has begun new work on institutional change in federal Indian policy over the 20th century.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Drew T. Halfmann Ph.D.

Cohort 8 — Michigan Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
University of California, Davis, Davis, CA

Dr. Halfmann received both his PhD and MA in Sociology from New York University in 2001, and his Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and Economics from the University of Wisconsin in 1990. His research focuses on social movements and the politics of health and social policy.  Professor Halfmann is the author of Doctors and Demonstrators: How Political Institutions Shape Abortion Law in the United States, Britain and Canada (University of Chicago Press, 2011), which won the 2012 Charles Tilly Best Book Award from the Section on Collective Behavior and Social Movements of the American Sociological Association. His research has appeared in the American Sociological Review, Social Problems, Mobilization, HEALTH, Studies in American Political Development, and the Journal of Policy History.  His current research is on the African-American struggle for health equality from Reconstruction to Obamacare.  He is a member of the Scholars Strategy Network and co-director of its Bay Area Regional Network. 

Discipline: Sociology
		

Catherine Lee Ph.D.

Cohort 10 — Michigan Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ

Dr. Lee received her PhD in Sociology from the University of California, Los Angeles. She examines how meanings of race and ethnicity shape social relations and inequalities across three critical sites: immigration; science and medicine; and law and society. Catherine is the author of Fictive Kinship: Family Reunification and the Meaning of Race and Nation in American Immigration (2013, Russell Sage) and co-editor of Genetics and the Unsettled Past: The Collision of DNA, Race, and History (2012, Rutgers University Press). Her current projects include an investigation of racial disparities in pain management and the politics of narcotics control and a study of how social institutions are addressing ideas of racial ambiguity or uncertainty tied to shifting demographics and rise of multi-raciality.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Taeku Lee Ph.D.

Cohort 6 — Yale Alumni List
Professor of Political Science and Law, Department of Political Science
University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA

Dr. Lee received his PhD from the University of Chicago and his AB and MPP from Harvard University. Lee is also Associate Director of the Haas Institute at Berkeley, Managing Director of Asian American Decisions, and Co-Principal Investigator of the National Asian American Survey. Lee is currently Treasurer and on the Executive Council for the American Political Science Association and serves on the Board of Overseers of the American National Election Studies and the General Social Survey, and on the National Advisory Committee for the U.S. Census Bureau.

His book, Mobilizing Public Opinion (2002), received the American Political Science Association’s J. David Greenstone Award and the Southern Political Science Association’s V.O. Key Award. His also co-editor of Transforming Politics, Transforming America (2006) on immigrant political incorporation and co-author of the just-finished Race, Immigration, and (Non)Partisanship in America.  Currently, he is co-editing the Oxford Handbook of Racial and Ethnic Politics in the United States and co-editing a volume for the World Bank titled Voice with Teeth: Public Opinion and Accountability.  Lee is also embarking on two new books: a collection of essays tentatively titled "Race, Identity, Power, and Method", a volume for the Russell Sage Foundation based on the 2008 National Asian American Survey (co-authored with his co-Principal Investigators on that project).  At Berkeley, Lee was previously the Director of the IGS Center on the Politics of Immigration, Race, and Ethnicity, chair of the Diversity and Democracy Cluster of the Berkeley Diversity Research Initiative, and Senior Faculty Fellow at the Chief Justice Earl Warren Institute for Race, Ethnicity, and Diversity. Prior to coming to Berkeley, Lee was Assistant Professor at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. He was also previously Assistant Professor of Public Policy at Harvard, Fernand Braudel Senior Fellow at the European University Institute, and Non-Resident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Evan S. Lieberman Ph.D

Cohort 7 — Yale Alumni List
Professor, Department of Political Science
Total Professor of Political Science and Contemporary Africa
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA

Dr. Lieberman received his PhD from the University of California, Berkeley. He conducts research in the field of comparative politics, with a focus on development and ethnic conflict in sub-Saharan Africa. Lieberman received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of Boundaries of Contagion: How Ethnic Politics have Shaped Government Responses to AIDS (Princeton University Press 2009) and Race and Regionalism in the Politics of Taxation in Brazil and South Africa (Cambridge University Press 2003), and has published articles in the American Political Science Review, Annual Review of Political Science, Comparative Political Studies, Politics & Society, Studies in Comparative International Development, and World Development. Lieberman is recipient of the 2014 David Collier Mid-Career Award, the 2010 Giovanni Sartori Book prize, the 2004 Mattei Dogan book prize, the 2002 Gabriel A. Almond dissertation award; and the 2002 Mary Parker Follett article award. He was a Fulbright fellow in South Africa in 1997-98. Previously, he was Professor and Associate Chair in the Department of Politics at Princeton University (2002-14).

Discipline: Political Science
		

Julia Lynch Ph.D.

Cohort 10 — Harvard Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Political Science
Senior Fellow, Leonard Davis Institute for Health Economics
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Dr. Lynch received her PhD in political science from the University of California, Berkeley and a BA in government from Harvard University.  Her research concerns the politics of inequality, social policy, and the economy in comparative perspective, with a focus on the countries of Western Europe and the United States.  At Penn, Lynch co-directs the Penn-Temple European Studies Colloquium, and is a faculty affiliate with the Penn-Wharton Public Policy Initiative, the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, the Lauder Institute and the Italian Studies Program.  Professor Lynch is also active in the profession more broadly, serving on the Executive Committee of the Council for European Studies as well as on the editorial boards of Comparative Political Studies, Journal of European Social Policy, and Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law. Lynch has received major grants and fellowships from the Mellon Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the National Science Foundation, and the Social Science Research Council.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Eric L. McDaniel Ph.D.

Cohort 15 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Government
University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX

Dr. McDaniel holds a PhD in Political Science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Dr. McDaniel specializes in American politics. His research areas include religion and politics, Black politics, and organizational behavior. His research focuses on religion and politics, and racial and ethnic politics. He is particularly interested in the role of Black religious institutions in shaping Black political behavior. His recent book, Politics in the Pews: The Political Mobilization of Black Churches (2008), examines the determinants of Black church political engagement. He is currently working on projects that examine the political consequences of differing religious interpretations and how people define citizenship. His project while in the Program examined how religious interpretation influences attitudes towards health care policy.

Discipline: Political Science