Population Health

Megan Andrew Ph.D.

Cohort 16 — Michigan Alumni List
Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology
University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN

Dr. Andrew received her PhD from the University of Wisconsin, Madison in 2009.  Her research focuses on the intergenerational and social psychological determinants of young adults’ education and health attainments.  In previous research, she has evaluated the intergenerational impacts of serious health events in the parent generation, the life course production of education and health attainments among youth and young adults, and the association between socioeconomic segregation and infant health.  Her research has been published in Social Forces, American Journal of Public Health, Social Science Research, Sociological Methodology, and more.  Her research has been funded by the Spencer Foundation, the University of Michigan’s Center for Integrative Approaches to Health Disparities, and Stanford University’s Center on Poverty and Inequality.  

Discipline: Sociology
		

Sharon H. Bzostek Ph.D.

Cohort 16 — Harvard Alumni List
Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology
Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ

Dr. Bzostek received her PhD in sociology from Princeton University in 2009. Her primary research interests are in the fields of family demography, childhood inequality, and health disparities. Current research projects include a study of differential self-rating of health by race/ethnicity, an analysis of child health disparities resulting from instability in family structure, a study of the patterns and consequences of health insurance coverage among children in the same family, and an investigation of differences in maternal and paternal reports of children’s health status.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Christopher "Kitt" Carpenter Ph.D.

Cohort 9 — Michigan Alumni List
Professor of Economics, Department of Economics
Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN

Dr. Carpenter received his PhD in Economics from the University of California-Berkeley. He is a health economist who studies the effects of public policy interventions on health behaviors, particularly in the areas of substance use and cancer screenings.  He is also an expert on LGBT economic demography.  His current research examines the effects of minimum legal drinking ages in the United States and other countries as well as the effects of federal funding for cancer screenings for low-income populations.  His research has been continuously supported by the National Institutes of Health and the American Cancer Society.  He is also a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and serves as Associate Editor or Editorial Board member at several journals, including Journal of Health Economics, American Journal of Health Economics, Journal of the European Economic Association, and the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management.  He holds courtesy appointments in Medicine, Health, & Society and the Department of Health Policy.

Discipline: Economics
		

Daniel P. Carpenter Doctorate

Cohort 5 — Michigan Alumni List
Allie S. Freed Professor of Government, Department of Government
Director, Center for American Political Studies
Harvard University, Cambridge, MA

Dr. Carpenter received his doctorate from University of Chicago. He conducts research in American politics and political development, political economy, regulation and the history and political economy of pharmaceuticals.  He often blends narrative and statistical methods in his research, trying to harness the contributions of different perspectives.  He is author of The Forging of Bureaucratic Autonomy: Networks, Reputations and Policy Innovation in Executive Agencies, 1862-1928 (Princeton University Press, 2001), and Reputation and Power: Organizational Image and Pharmaceutical Regulation at the FDA (Princeton University Press, 2010).  His research and writing have appeared in Studies in American Political Development, the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political Science, the Journal of Politics, the Journal of Law, Economics and Organization, New England Journal of Medicine, Journal of the American Medical Association, Health Affairs, Bulletin of the History of Medicine, and Archives of Internal Medicine, among other professional venues.  He currently serves on the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Scientific Standards for Modified Risk Tobacco Products. Professor Carpenter has been a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford, and has held grants from the National Science Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Alfred Sloan foundation.  He currently serves as co-editor of the journal Studies in American Political Development and is co-director of Harvard’s Medications and Society Program.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Jacob E. Cheadle Ph.D.

Cohort 12 — Michigan Alumni List
Happold Associate Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology
University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE

Dr. Cheadle received his PhD in Sociology and Demography from Pennsylvania State University. He is also co-director of the Bio-sociology of Minority Health Disparities Research Lab with his colleague, Dr. Bridget Goosby. His research focuses on how social processes intersect with biological processes to create individual variation in social functioning and health from late childhood and into adulthood. For example, they are currently studying how experiencing racial discrimination interacts with stress physiology to shape health disparities in a community sample. In the laboratory, they are interested in how peer pressure can bias adolescent and college students’ decision-making towards risky behaviors. The different projects he is involved in seeks to integrate measures at multiple levels of analysis including social networks, physiology, neurobiology, and genetics. They are also interested in social experiences and health over daily to long-term time scales, and using survey and experimental methods.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Dalton Conley Ph.D.

Cohort 3 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Henry Putnam University Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology
Princeton University, Princeton, NJ

Dr. Conley received his PhD in sociology from Columbia University in 1996 and a PhD in Biology (Genomics) from NYU in 2014. His research focuses on how socio-economic status and health are transmitted across generations and on the public policies that affect those processes. He studies sibling differences in socioeconomic success; racial inequalities; the measurement of class; and how health and biology affect (and are affected by) social position. His publications include Being Black, Living in the Red; The Starting GateHonky; The Pecking Order; You May Ask Yourself; and Parentology. He is a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and has been the recipient of Guggenheim, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Russell Sage Foundation fellowships as well as a CAREER award and the Alan T. Waterman Award of the National Science Foundation.

 

His current work applies econometric methods for causal inference--namely, a natural experiment framework--to genome-wide data available in social surveys to model gene-by-environment interaction effects.  Examples in this vein include deploying the Vietnam draft lottery, twin differences in birth weight, exogenous job loss (such as plant closure), and sibling differences in genotype (polygenic scores) to questions of health, development and socioeconomic attainment across the life course.  I am also interested in mapping the genetic architecture of phenotypic plasticity, interrogating the assumptions underlying models for heritability, and characterizing social and genetic sorting as distinct processes.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Brian Goesling Ph.D.

Cohort 10 — Michigan Alumni List
Associate Director of Human Services Research
Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., Princeton, NJ

Dr.Goesling received his PhD in Sociology from the Pennsylvania State University. His expertise is in social programs and trends affecting families and youth. Dr. Goesling currently serves as project director for the Evaluation of Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Approaches, a large, multisite random assignment evaluation of promising approaches to prevent teen pregnancy. He also directs a systematic evidence review of teen pregnancy prevention programs, serves as principal investigator for a large, multisite random assignment evaluation of healthy relationship programs for youth, and directs an ongoing cost study of evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention programs. He has published more than a dozen scholarly book chapters and journal articles, including articles in the Journal of Adolescent HealthJournal of Health and Social BehaviorAmerican Sociological ReviewAmerican Journal of Sociology, and Social Forces. He coauthored a recent report for the U.S. Department of Education on the largest experimental evaluation to date of the effectiveness of mandatory random student drug testing in U.S. high schools. He has also authored research on systematic reviews, teen pregnancy prevention, teenagers’ attitudes toward marriage, the links between marriage and health, and health care coverage among families with children. 

Discipline: Sociology
		

Paula M. Lantz Ph.D.

Cohort 1 — Michigan Alumni List
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

Dr. Lantz received both her PhD in Sociology and her MA in Epidemiology from the University of Wisconsin. She also received her MA in Sociology from Washington University and her Bachelor of Arts degree from St. Olaf College. Dr. Lantz, a social demographer, studies the role of public health in health care reform, clinical preventive services (such as cancer screening and prenatal care), and social inequalities in health. She is particularly interested in the role of health care versus broad social policy aimed at social determinants of health in reducing social disparities in health status. She is currently doing research regarding the potential of social impact bonds to reduce Medicaid expenditures. Previously, she served an Associate Dean for Research and Policy Engagement and professor of public policy at the University of Michigan Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy. Prior to that, she acted as Professor and Chair of the Department of Health Policy at George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services, where she is also Professor of Public Policy.  She served as the Director of the Scholars in Health Policy Research Program at the University of Michigan site from 2002-2011.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Julia Lynch Ph.D.

Cohort 10 — Harvard Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Political Science
Senior Fellow, Leonard Davis Institute for Health Economics
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Dr. Lynch received her PhD in political science from the University of California, Berkeley and a BA in government from Harvard University.  Her research concerns the politics of inequality, social policy, and the economy in comparative perspective, with a focus on the countries of Western Europe and the United States.  At Penn, Lynch co-directs the Penn-Temple European Studies Colloquium, and is a faculty affiliate with the Penn-Wharton Public Policy Initiative, the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, the Lauder Institute and the Italian Studies Program.  Professor Lynch is also active in the profession more broadly, serving on the Executive Committee of the Council for European Studies as well as on the editorial boards of Comparative Political Studies, Journal of European Social Policy, and Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law. Lynch has received major grants and fellowships from the Mellon Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the National Science Foundation, and the Social Science Research Council.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Christine M. Percheski Ph.D.

Cohort 15 — Harvard Alumni List
Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology
Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

Dr. Percheski received her PhD in Sociology at Princeton University. Dr. Percheski's studies how recent and ongoing changes in family life are related to changing patterns of social inequality in the United States. Her previous work has considered questions such as whether becoming a father affects employment differently for married and unmarried men, how increases in family income inequality are related to increasing women's employment and single motherhood, how employment patterns have changed across birth cohorts of college-educated women in professional occupations, and how childhood family experiences are associated with non-marital births during early adulthood. Percheski has also examined the relationship between family characteristics and social inequality  in several domains including poverty risk during the recent recession, health insurance coverage for adults, and health care utilization among children. Dr. Percheski's current research portfolio includes an NSF-funded examination of wealth inequality in the United States. In collaboration with Christina Gibson-Davis, Percheski is assessing trends in the wealth of households with children relative to the elderly, variations in wealth by family structure, and racial gaps in wealth poverty.

Discipline: Sociology