Medicaid

Reagan A. Baughman Ph.D.

Cohort 8 — Michigan Alumni List
John A. Hogan Distinguished Professor in Economics and Associate Professor of Economics, Peter T. Paul College of Business and Economics
University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH

Dr. Baughman received her bachelor’s degree in economics (with a minor in French) from Drew University in Madison, NJ and her Ph.D. in Economics from Syracuse University. She has been a faculty member at the University of New Hampshire since 2003, teaching undergraduate students in microeconomic theory courses, labor economics and public finance, and graduate students in health economics and research workshops. During the time she has been at UNH, she has spent time visiting two public policy organizations. She served as a Visiting Scholar at the New England Public Policy Center of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston during the summer of 2007 and as a Visiting Fellow at the U.S. Congressional Budget Office in Washington, DC from September 2009 to July 2010. Her favorite experience to date as a UNH professor has been accompanying 27 business and economics students to study at Corvinus University in Budapest during the Fall 2007 semester. While in Budapest, she taught a course in health economics to a group of students from 8 different countries and traveled with UNH students in Hungary, Slovakia and Poland.

Discipline: Economics
		

Andrea Louise Campbell Ph.D.

Cohort 8 — Yale Alumni List
Arthur and Ruth Sloan Professor, Department of Political Science
Department Head
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA

Dr. Campbell received her PhD from University of California-Berkeley and her AB from Harvard University. Her research examines the interaction between public policies and mass attitudes and behavior, with a particular interest in the politics of social policy, health policy and tax policy. She is the author of How Policies Make Citizens: Senior Citizen Activism and the American Welfare State (Princeton, 2003) and, with Kimberly J. Morgan, The Delegated Welfare State: Medicare, Markets, and the Governance of Social Policy (Oxford, 2011). She is also completing a book manuscript on public opinion and taxes in the United States.  Campbell is a past Scholar in Health Policy Research (Cohort VIII) and recipient of a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Investigator Award. Other funders include the National Science Foundation and Russell Sage Foundation.  She is a member of the National Academy of Social Insurance and served on the National Academy of Sciences Commission on the Fiscal Future of the United States.

Discipline: Political Science
Research Interests: Political Behavior
		

A. Bowen Garrett Ph.D.

Cohort 3 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Senior Fellow
The Urban Institute, Washington, DC

Dr. Garrett received his PhD from Columbia University. His research focuses extensively on health reform and health policy topics, combining rigorous empirical methods and economic thinking with an understanding of the policy landscape to better inform policy making. He led the development of Urban's Health Insurance Policy Simulation Model and conducted numerous studies of the likely effects of alternative reform proposals for the Obama administration, the state of New York, and private foundations. He has written extensively on employer-sponsored insurance, Medicaid and the uninsured, and Medicare's prospective payment systems. Previously, Garrett was chief economist of the Center for US Health System Reform and McKinsey Advanced Health Analytics at McKinsey & Company (2010–13). He is a research associate with the Info-Metrics Institute at American University and has taught quantitative methods and economic statistics at Georgetown University.

Discipline: Economics
Research Interests:
		

John D. Huber Ph.D.

Cohort 1 — Michigan Alumni List
Professor, Department of Political Science
Columbia University, New York, NY

Dr. Huber received his both his PhD and MA in Political Science from the University of Rochester in 1991 and 1989 respectively. He received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Lawrence University in 1984. His research focuses on the comparative study of democratic processes.   He recently published Exclusion by Elections:  Inequality, Ethnic Identity and Democracy, which develops a theory about how inequality can foster identity politics, which can then limit the propensity of a democracy to respond to inequality. In addition to numerous articles, he previously  published Rationalizing Parliament: Legislative Institutions and Party Politics in France, and Deliberate Discretion? Institutional Foundations of Bureaucratic Autonomy (with Charles Shipan).  His  current projects focus on bureaucracy, civil war and inter-generational solidarity. Huber served as chair of the political science department from 2006-09 and 2010-13, and  was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2013.

Discipline: Political Science
Health Policy Interests: Medicaid
		

Vincent L. Hutchings Ph.D.

Cohort 7 — Yale Alumni List
Professor, Department of Political Science
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

Dr. Hutchings received both his PhD and MA in Political Science from the University of California, Los Angeles and his Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science from San Jose State University. Dr. Hutchings interests include public opinion, elections, voting behavior, and African American politics. He recently published a book at Princeton University Press entitled Public Opinion and Democratic Accountability: How Citizens Learn About Politics, that focuses on how, and under what circumstances, citizens monitor (and consequently influence) their elected representative's voting behavior. In addition to this project, Professor Hutchings also studies how the size of the African American constituency in congressional districts can influence legislative responsiveness to Black interests. The most recent product of this research was published in the Journal of Politics. Finally, he is also interested in the ways that campaign communications can "prime" various group identities and subsequently affect candidate evaluations. This study examines how campaign communications can subtly---and not so subtly---prime voter's racial (and other group-based) attitudes and subsequently affect their political decisions. Research from this project, co-authored with Professor Nicholas Valentino and Ismail White, has been published in the American Political Science Review. Professor Hutchings, and collaborators Ashley Jardina, Rob Mickey, and Hanes Walton, are currently exploring how different news frames can diminish or exacerbate tensions among Whites, Blacks and Latinos. Professor Hutchings received multiple grants from the National Science Foundation, most recently (2009) for his project entitled “Elite Communications and Racial Group Conflict in the 21st Century.” He is currently the University of Michigan Principal Investigator for the American National Election Study for the 2012 election cycle.

 

Discipline: Political Science
		

Lauren M. MacLean Ph.D.

Cohort 9 — Michigan Alumni List
Professor, Department of Political Science
Arthur F. Bentley Chair in the Department of Political Science
Indiana University, Bloomington, IN

Dr. MacLean received her PhD and MA from the University of California, Berkeley, and her Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Pennsylvania. Her research interests are comparative political economy and public policy, with a focus on the politics of state formation, public service provision, and citizenship in Africa and the U.S.

In her first book, Informal Institutions and Citizenship in Rural Africa: Risk and Reciprocity in Ghana and Cote d'Ivoire (Cambridge University Press, 2010; winner of the APSA 2011 Sartori Book Award; finalist for the ASA Herskovits Award), Dr. MacLean theorizes that divergent histories of state formation help explain variation in informal institutions and everyday practices of citizenship in two similar cross-border regions of Ghana and Cote d’Ivoire. With Melani Cammett (Harvard University), Dr. MacLean theorizes the origins, dynamics and consequences of non-state provision in the Global South in a special issue of Studies of Comparative and International Development as well as an edited volume, The Politics of Non-State Social Welfare (Cornell University Press, 2014). Dr. MacLean has also conducted fieldwork for a project on the politics of tribal consultation analyzing participatory health policymaking across the 34 states with federally-recognized tribes in the U.S.

Most recently, Dr. MacLean is investigating the politics of public service provision in the electricity sector in Africa. She was selected as a 2017 Carnegie Fellow to investigate how electricity provision may promote democracy and environmental sustainability in Ghana. She is also collaborating with Jennifer Brass (IU-SPEA), Christopher Gore (Ryerson University, Canada) and Elizabeth Baldwin (University of Arizona) on a comparative project analyzing the politics of electricity provision in Ghana, Kenya, and Uganda. Dr. MacLean has also published articles in a range of journals including Comparative Political Studies, Comparative Studies in Society and History, Environmental and Resource Economics, the International Journal of Public Administration, the Journal of Development Studies, Journal of Modern African Studies, Studies in Comparative International Development, and World Development.

Dr. MacLean is also known nationally and internationally for her work on the topic of field research methodology. She has co-authored a book, Field Research in Political Science (Cambridge University Press, 2015), with Diana Kapiszewski and Ben Read.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Jamila Michener Ph.D.

Cohort 18 — Michigan Alumni List
Assistant Professor, Department of Government
Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

Dr. Michener received her PhD in Political Science from the University of Michigan. She is interested in race and public policy in the United States. Her research has been supported by the Russell Sage Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Ford Foundation.

Her research aims to identify: 1) the conditions under which economically and racially marginalized groups engage in the political process and 2) the many ways public policy shapes the lives of people in these groups. Particular topics that animate this agenda include: the political causes of racial disparities in poverty rates; the effects of state policies on the political behavior of people living in poverty; the relationship between neighborhood disorder and local political participation; the determinants of state compliance with the public assistance provisions (section 7) of the National Voter Registration Act; and the community level political effects of concentrated disadvantage.

Her academic work has been published or is forthcoming in Political Behavior, the Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law, Poverty and Public Policy and the Forum. Dr. Michener's (forthcoming) book with Cambridge University Press is entitled, Fragmented Democracy: Medicaid, Federalism, and Unequal Politics. Her public writing has been featured in the New York Times, the Washington Post and the American Prospect.

In addition to writing and research, she is a co-leader of the Finger Lakes Branch of the Scholars Strategy Network, a faculty affiliate at the Center for the Study of Inequality, a graduate field faculty member in the Africana Studies Department, a faculty affiliate in the American Studies Program and an affiliate at the Cornell Population Center. She also sits on the advisory board of the Cornell Prison Education Program and teach classes in local prisons.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Robert P. Saldin Ph.D.

Cohort 17 — Harvard Alumni List
Professor, Department of Political Science
University of Montana , Missoula, MT

Dr. Saldin holds a PhD in political science from the University of Virginia.  He is the author of War, the American State, and Politics since 1898 (Cambridge University Press, 2011), and his scholarly articles have appeared in venues such as The Journal of Politics, Journal of Policy History, and Political Research Quarterly.  As a Scholar, he studied long-term care’s policy history.

Discipline: Political Science