Health Disparities and Inequalities - Class inequalities in health

Scott J. Adams Ph.D.

Cohort 7 — Michigan Alumni List
Associate Professor and Department Chair, Department of Economics
University of Wisconsin- Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI

Dr. Adams received his PhD from the Michigan State University and his Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Scranton.  He works on a number of different policy-related topics in labor economics and health economics, including public smoking bans, employer-provided health insurance, and minimum wage legislation.  His work has been published in the Journal of Human Resources, Journal of Public Economics, and the Review of Economics and Statistics, among other outlets.  He served as a Senior Economist for education, labor and welfare with the White House’s Council of Economic Advisers under both Presidents Bush and Obama.

Discipline: Economics
		

Karen R. Albright Ph.D.

Cohort 11 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology and Criminology, Affiliated Faculty in the Graduate School of Social Work
University of Denver, Denver, CO

Dr. Albright received her PhD in Sociology from New York University. Dr. Albright’s research interests focus on health behaviors among socioeconomically disadvantaged populations, the barriers to their care, and potential solutions for improving care (e.g., collaborations between public health entities and private practices). In recent years, she has become particularly interested in how distrust of pharmaceutical medicine and the U.S. health care system affects health behaviors and outcomes. Dr. Albright’s research has been published in a wide variety of social scientific and medical journals, including American Journal of Public Health, Academic Pediatrics, Sociological Forum, and American Behavioral Scientist. Her research has been funded by, among others, the National Institutes of Health, the Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute, and the National Science Foundation. She is the Vice-President Elect of the Association for Applied and Clinical Sociology. 

Discipline: Sociology
		

Megan Andrew Ph.D.

Cohort 16 — Michigan Alumni List
Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology
University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN

Dr. Andrew received her PhD from the University of Wisconsin, Madison in 2009.  Her research focuses on the intergenerational and social psychological determinants of young adults’ education and health attainments.  In previous research, she has evaluated the intergenerational impacts of serious health events in the parent generation, the life course production of education and health attainments among youth and young adults, and the association between socioeconomic segregation and infant health.  Her research has been published in Social Forces, American Journal of Public Health, Social Science Research, Sociological Methodology, and more.  Her research has been funded by the Spencer Foundation, the University of Michigan’s Center for Integrative Approaches to Health Disparities, and Stanford University’s Center on Poverty and Inequality.  

Discipline: Sociology
		

Ingrid Gould Ellen Ph.D.

Cohort 4 — Yale Alumni List
Paulette Goddard Professor of Urban Policy and Planning, Robert F. Wagner School of Public Service
Director, Furman Center for Real Estate and Urban Policy
New York University, New York, NY

Dr. Ellen received a PhD, MPP and an AB (in Applied Mathematics) from Harvard University. She joined the NYU Wagner faculty in the fall of 1997 and presently teaches courses in microeconomics, urban economics, and urban policy. Dr. Ellen's research interests center on housing and urban policy.  She is author of Sharing America's Neighborhoods: The Prospects for Stable Racial Integration (Harvard University Press, 2000) and has written numerous journal articles and book chapters related to housing policy, community development, and school and neighborhood segregation. Before coming to NYU, Dr. Ellen held visiting positions at the Urban Institute and the Brookings Institution.

Discipline: Economics
		

Brian A. Gifford Ph.D.

Cohort 10 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Director, Research and Measurement
Integrated Benefits Institute, San Francisco, CA

Dr. Gifford received his PhD in Sociology from New York University and his Bachelor of Arts degree in Sociology from University of California - Berkeley. He researches workforce health, performance, absence, and disability leaves for the Integrated Benefits Institute (IBI), a 501(c)(6) non-profit organization. He has been a lead or contributing author on peer-reviewed and Institute-published studies on topics such as employees’ decisions about working during spells of illness, disability leave costs for acute coronary syndromes and venous thromboembolism, health risks and sick day absences, how CFOs use information to make decisions about their organizations’ healthcare and wellness benefits, and the links between FMLA and paid disability leaves. His prior appointment was as a social scientist with the RAND Corporation.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Pamela Herd Ph.D.

Cohort 9 — Michigan Alumni List
Professor of Public Affairs and Sociology, LaFollette School of Public Affairs and Department of Sociology
Faculty Affiliate, Institute for Research on Poverty
University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI

Dr. Herd received her PhD in Sociology from Syracuse University and her Bachelor of Arts degree from Colby College. Her work focuses on aging, policy, health, and inequality. She has two streams of research. One stream examines how social policies (i.e., Social Security) affect gender, race, and class inequalities. The second stream focuses on the relationship between social factors and health. She is the Principal Investigator of the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, a member of the Board of Overseers of the General Social Survey, a member of the Board of Overseers of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, and a member of the National Academy of Social Insurance.

Herd co-authored the 2007 book Market Friendly or Family Friendly? The State and Gender Inequality in Old Age with Madonna Harrington Meyer. The book is part of the American Sociological Association's Rose Series on Public Policy and was the winner of the Gerontological Society of America Section on Behavioral and Social Sciences Kalish Publication Award. She is author of numerous articles and chapters that have appeared in Social Forces, Gender and Society, Journals of Gerontology, Journal of Health and Social Behavior, and The Gerontologist among others.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Rashawn Ray Ph.D.

Cohort 17 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
University of Maryland, College Park, College Park, MD

Dr. Ray received his PhD in Sociology from Indiana University. His research addresses the mechanisms that manufacture and maintain racial and social inequality. His work also speaks to ways that inequality may be attenuated through racial uplift activism and social policy. He is the author of Race and Ethnic Relations in the 21st Century: History, Theory, Institutions, and Policy. His work has appeared in journals including the Annual Review of Public Health, Journal of Urban Health, American Education Research Journal, Ethnic and Racial Studies, and the Journal of Contemporary Ethnography. Ray has two forthcoming books: The Loves Jones Cohort: Single and Living Alone in the Black Middle Class with Dr. Kris Marsh and Bordering Chaos: Family and Work in a Racially-Diverse America with Dr. Pam Jackson. Dr. Ray has been awarded funding from the National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Ford Foundation, American Sociological Association Minority Fellowship Program, and the Society for the Study of Social Problems. Ray was selected as 40 Under 40 Prince George’s County in 2014, Outstanding Black Male Leader of Tomorrow for the city of Bloomington, IN in 2010, and the Co-Chair of the Ford Foundation Scholars Conference in 2015. He has been awarded mentorship awards from the Philip Merrill Presidential Scholars Program, Ronald E. McNair Post-Baccalaureate Program, and the Departments of Sociology at the University of Maryland and Indiana University. Previously, Dr. Ray served on the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington Planning Committee and the Commission on Racial Justice with Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. Currently, he serves on the editorial boards for Sociology of Race and Ethnicity and Social Psychology Quarterly as well as the American Sociological Association Committee on the Status of Racial and Ethnic Minorities in Sociology. Dr. Ray is a frequent contributor to the New York Times and has also written for Huffington Post.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Stephanie A. Robert Ph.D.

Cohort 3 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Professor, School of Social Work
University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI

Dr. Robert received her PhD in Social work from University of Michigan and her MSW from University of Michigan. Her research focuses on how social and economic aspects of people’s lives affect their health and well-being over the life course. She demonstrates how socioeconomic status and race affect health over the life course and into old age. Many of her publications focus on how neighborhood context affects the health of residents and contributes to health disparities. She is co-director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholars program, which trains postdoctoral researchers from a range of fields to conduct research on population health, and to translate that knowledge into practice and policy. One of her current research projects examines the general public’s views about health disparities by race, income, and education. She aims to see to what degree people recognize that health is affected by a range of factors, not just medical care and individual health behaviors. She examines the public’s willingness to consider new social and economic policy as mechanisms to improve physical health and reduce health disparities. Another current project examines the time use of older adults, examining racial and educational differences in time spent on caregiving and volunteer activities. Yet another project examines whether the social environment contributes to birth outcomes and racial disparities in birth outcomes in Wisconsin. Her ongoing research also examines multiple facets of neighborhood environments and how they can promote or inhibit health among residents, particularly older adults.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Abigail C. Saguy Ph.D.

Cohort 7 — Yale Alumni List
Professor, Department of Sociology
Associate Professor, Department of Women’s Studies
University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA

Dr. Saguy received both her PhD and MA in Sociology from Princeton University and her Bachelor of Arts degree from College of Letters, Wesleyan Univeresity. My teaching and research interests include gender, culture, the body, politics, law and public health. Her interest also include in how cultural schemas shape power relations and how subordinate groups are sometimes able to create new cultural meaning to increase their control. She pursued these interests through my comparative research on sexual harassment definitions and on framing contests over fatness. In these “hot” or highly contested topics, social actors make their cultural assumptions explicit, making them ideally suited to cultural analysis. In her work, she used multiple methods and cross-national, cross-issue, and cross-institutional comparisons. In recent years, the “obesity epidemic” has emerged as a top public health concern in the United States and abroad. Scholars, journalists, and politicians alike are scrambling to find answers. What or who is responsible for this crisis and what can be done to stop it? In contrast, in What's Wrong with Fat? (WWwF?) She argues that these fraught debates obscure more important sociological questions: How has fatness come to be understood as a public health crisis at all? Why has the view of fatness as a medical problem and public health crisis come to dominate more positive framings of weight – as consistent with health, beauty, or a legitimate rights claim—in public discourse? Why are heavy individuals singled out for blame? And what are the consequences of understanding weight in these ways? Building on WWwF?, she conducted a series of ongoing experments with David Frederick (Psychology, Chapman University) that examine the effect of reading different news articles about body weight have on attitudes about health, health policy, and weight-based prejudice. In a collaboration with French sociologists Henri Bergeron and Patrick Castell, she is investigating the extent to which frames shape policy, focusing specifically on the case of French obesity policy. Her latest book is "What's Wrong with Fat? (2013, Oxford University Press) and What is Sexual Harassment? From Capitol Hill to the Sorbonne (2003, University of California Press).

Discipline: Sociology