Health Disparities and Inequalities - Racial and ethnic health disparities

Megan Andrew Ph.D.

Cohort 16 — Michigan Alumni List
Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology
University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN

Dr. Andrew received her PhD from the University of Wisconsin, Madison in 2009.  Her research focuses on the intergenerational and social psychological determinants of young adults’ education and health attainments.  In previous research, she has evaluated the intergenerational impacts of serious health events in the parent generation, the life course production of education and health attainments among youth and young adults, and the association between socioeconomic segregation and infant health.  Her research has been published in Social Forces, American Journal of Public Health, Social Science Research, Sociological Methodology, and more.  Her research has been funded by the Spencer Foundation, the University of Michigan’s Center for Integrative Approaches to Health Disparities, and Stanford University’s Center on Poverty and Inequality.  

Discipline: Sociology
		

Christopher J. Bonastia Ph.D.

Cohort 8 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
Lehman College and CUNY Graduate Center, Bronx, NY

Dr. Bonastia received his Ph.D. from New York University in 2001.  Dr. Bonastia’s work focuses on historical explorations of race, policy and politics.  His first book, Knocking on the Door: The Federal Government’s Attempt to Desegregate the Suburbs, was published in 2006 by Princeton University Press.  His recent book, Southern Stalemate: Five Years without Public Education in Prince Edward County, Virginia, was published in early 2012 by the University of Chicago Press.  The latter project was funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.  In summer 2011, he was a visiting fellow at the NEH Summer Institute for College and University Teachers at Harvard University.  His work has also been published in the Journal of Policy History (examining civil rights enforcement in health care), the Du Bois Review, Social Science History and Social Problems, among other publications.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Cathy J. Cohen Ph.D.

Cohort 3 — Yale Alumni List
David and Mary Wilson Green Professor, Department of Political Science
University of Chicago, Chicago, IL

Dr. Cohen also served as the Deputy Provost for Graduate Education and is the former Director of the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture at the University of Chicago. Cohen is the author of two books: Democracy Remixed: Black Youth and the Future of American Politics (Oxford University Press 2010) and The Boundaries of Blackness: AIDS and the Breakdown of Black Politics (University of Chicago Press 1999) and co-editor with Kathleen Jones and Joan Tronto of Women Transforming Politics: An Alternative Reader (NYU, 1997). Her work has been published in numerous journals and edited volumes including the American Political Science Review, GLQ, NOMOS, and Social Text. Cohen is principal investigator of two major projects: The Black Youth Project and the Mobilization, Change and Political and Civic Engagement Project. Her general field of specialization is American politics, although her research interests include African-American politics, women and politics, lesbian and gay politics, and social movements.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Ingrid Gould Ellen Ph.D.

Cohort 4 — Yale Alumni List
Paulette Goddard Professor of Urban Policy and Planning, Robert F. Wagner School of Public Service
Director, Furman Center for Real Estate and Urban Policy
New York University, New York, NY

Dr. Ellen received a PhD, MPP and an AB (in Applied Mathematics) from Harvard University. She joined the NYU Wagner faculty in the fall of 1997 and presently teaches courses in microeconomics, urban economics, and urban policy. Dr. Ellen's research interests center on housing and urban policy.  She is author of Sharing America's Neighborhoods: The Prospects for Stable Racial Integration (Harvard University Press, 2000) and has written numerous journal articles and book chapters related to housing policy, community development, and school and neighborhood segregation. Before coming to NYU, Dr. Ellen held visiting positions at the Urban Institute and the Brookings Institution.

Discipline: Economics
		

Darrick C. Hamilton Ph.D.

Cohort 8 — Yale Alumni List
Associate Professor, Economics and Urban Policy, The Milano School of International Affairs and Urban Policy
Director of Public and Urban Policy Doctoral Programs
The New School, New York, NY

Dr. Hamilton received his PhD from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill in 1999. He is a faculty research fellow at the Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis at The New School, the president-elect of the National Economic Association (NEA), an associate director of the Diversity Initiative for Tenure in Economics Program, serving on the Board of Overseers for the General Social Survey (GSS), the National Science Foundation (NSF) funded Social Observatories Coordinating Network (SOCN), the National Academies of Sciences standing committee on Future of Major NSF-Funded Social Science Surveys, senior research associate at the Samuel DuBois Cook Center on Social Equity at Duke University, and co-principal investigator of the National Asset Scorecard in Communities of Color Project (NASCC).

Professor Hamilton is a stratification economist, whose work focuses on the causes, consequences and remedies of racial and ethnic inequality in economic and health outcomes, which includes an examination of the intersection of identity, racism, colorism, and socioeconomic outcomes.  He has authored numerous scholarly articles on socioeconomic stratification in education, marriage, wealth, homeownership, health (including mental health), and labor market outcomes.

He has written many articles/opinion-editorials, which include the translation of his research findings from academic journals to popular press publication, examples include the Atlanta Journal ConstitutionThe American Prospect, the Christian Science MonitorDissent Magazine, The New York TimesThe Huffington Post and the Washington Post. He has been cited quoted and has made many media appearances to debate social topics, discuss my research and offer insights on social policy in print and broadcast media outlets.   Finally, he has provided consultation to numerous government and not-for-profit organizations including AFL-CIO, American Human Development Project, Center for American Progress, Black Equity Alliance, CFED, Center for Social Development, Congressional Black Caucus, Council of Economic Advisors-The White House, Demos, Economic Policy Institute, Empire State Coalition of Youth and Family Services, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, Food Bank of New York City, Insight: Center for Community and Economic Development, Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, National Urban League, PolicyLink, SEIU, and U.S. Office of Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

Discipline: Economics
		

Pamela Herd Ph.D.

Cohort 9 — Michigan Alumni List
Professor of Public Affairs and Sociology, LaFollette School of Public Affairs and Department of Sociology
Faculty Affiliate, Institute for Research on Poverty
University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI

Dr. Herd received her PhD in Sociology from Syracuse University and her Bachelor of Arts degree from Colby College. Her work focuses on aging, policy, health, and inequality. She has two streams of research. One stream examines how social policies (i.e., Social Security) affect gender, race, and class inequalities. The second stream focuses on the relationship between social factors and health. She is the Principal Investigator of the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, a member of the Board of Overseers of the General Social Survey, a member of the Board of Overseers of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, and a member of the National Academy of Social Insurance.

Herd co-authored the 2007 book Market Friendly or Family Friendly? The State and Gender Inequality in Old Age with Madonna Harrington Meyer. The book is part of the American Sociological Association's Rose Series on Public Policy and was the winner of the Gerontological Society of America Section on Behavioral and Social Sciences Kalish Publication Award. She is author of numerous articles and chapters that have appeared in Social Forces, Gender and Society, Journals of Gerontology, Journal of Health and Social Behavior, and The Gerontologist among others.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Lauren M. MacLean Ph.D.

Cohort 9 — Michigan Alumni List
Professor, Department of Political Science
Arthur F. Bentley Chair in the Department of Political Science
Indiana University, Bloomington, IN

Dr. MacLean received her PhD and MA from the University of California, Berkeley, and her Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Pennsylvania. Her research interests are comparative political economy and public policy, with a focus on the politics of state formation, public service provision, and citizenship in Africa and the U.S.

In her first book, Informal Institutions and Citizenship in Rural Africa: Risk and Reciprocity in Ghana and Cote d'Ivoire (Cambridge University Press, 2010; winner of the APSA 2011 Sartori Book Award; finalist for the ASA Herskovits Award), Dr. MacLean theorizes that divergent histories of state formation help explain variation in informal institutions and everyday practices of citizenship in two similar cross-border regions of Ghana and Cote d’Ivoire. With Melani Cammett (Harvard University), Dr. MacLean theorizes the origins, dynamics and consequences of non-state provision in the Global South in a special issue of Studies of Comparative and International Development as well as an edited volume, The Politics of Non-State Social Welfare (Cornell University Press, 2014). Dr. MacLean has also conducted fieldwork for a project on the politics of tribal consultation analyzing participatory health policymaking across the 34 states with federally-recognized tribes in the U.S.

Most recently, Dr. MacLean is investigating the politics of public service provision in the electricity sector in Africa. She was selected as a 2017 Carnegie Fellow to investigate how electricity provision may promote democracy and environmental sustainability in Ghana. She is also collaborating with Jennifer Brass (IU-SPEA), Christopher Gore (Ryerson University, Canada) and Elizabeth Baldwin (University of Arizona) on a comparative project analyzing the politics of electricity provision in Ghana, Kenya, and Uganda. Dr. MacLean has also published articles in a range of journals including Comparative Political Studies, Comparative Studies in Society and History, Environmental and Resource Economics, the International Journal of Public Administration, the Journal of Development Studies, Journal of Modern African Studies, Studies in Comparative International Development, and World Development.

Dr. MacLean is also known nationally and internationally for her work on the topic of field research methodology. She has co-authored a book, Field Research in Political Science (Cambridge University Press, 2015), with Diana Kapiszewski and Ben Read.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Helen B. Marrow Ph.D.

Cohort 15 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
Tufts University, Medford, MA

Dr. Marrow received her PhD in Sociology and Social Policy from Harvard University in 2007.  She is co-editor of The New Americans: A Guide to Immigration since 1965 (Harvard University Press, 2007), and her other research has appeared in the American Sociological Review, Ethnicities, Ethnic and Racial Studies, and Perspectives on Politics.  While in the Program, Dr. Marrow completed a book entitled New Destination Dreaming:  Immigration, Race, and Legal Status in the Rural American South (2011, Stanford University Press).  She has also investigated safety-net primary healthcare providers’ experiences with and views about providing care to undocumented immigrants, in an effort to more deeply understand their roles as institutional agents of immigrant incorporation and exclusion. Dr. Marrow is an Associate Professor of Sociology at Tufts University.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Christopher S. Parker Ph.D.

Cohort 12 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Stuart A. Scheingold Professor of Social Justice and Political Science, Department of Political Science
University of Washington, Seattle, WA

Dr. Parker received his PhD from University of Chicago and his Bachelor of Arts degree from University of California, Los Angeles. Dr. Parker's research takes a behavioral approach to historical events. More specifically, he brings survey data to bear on questions of historical import. His first book, Fighting for Democracy: Black Veterans and the Struggle Against White Supremacy in the
Postwar South (Princeton University Press, 2009), takes a fresh approach to the civil rights movement by gauging the extent to which black veterans contributed to social change. A second book, now underway and using data collected in 1968, examines the ideological and sociological origins of what has come to be known as the urban crisis of the 1960s. In short, it examines the micro-foundations of the disturbances that swept America in the late 1960s. A Robert Wood Johnson Scholar (2005-07), he has published in the Journal of Politics, International Security, Political Research Quarterly, and the Du Bois Review.  

His publications include: "Change They Can’t Believe In: The Tea Party and Reactionary Politics in Contemporary America. Princeton University Press, 2013, "Fighting for Democracy: Black Veterans and the Struggle Against White Supremacy in the Postwar South. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2009, “A Subjective Assessment of Veterans Health Care: From the Veteran's Point of View,” in The Politics of Veterans’ Policy: Federal Policy in the Modern United States, edited by Stephen Ortiz. University of Florida Press, 2012,“War and African American Citizenship, 1865-1965: The Role of Military Service,” In The Handbook of African American Citizenship 1865-Present, edited by Henry Louis Gates, jr., Claude Steele, Lawrence D. Bobo, Michael C. Dawson, Gerald Jaynes, Lisa Crooms-Robinson, and Linda Darling. Oxford University Press, 2012, “The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP),” and In The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Social and Political Movements, edited by David A. Snow, Donatella Della Porta, Bert Klandermans, and Doug McAdam. Blackwell Press, 2012.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Rashawn Ray Ph.D.

Cohort 17 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
University of Maryland, College Park, College Park, MD

Dr. Ray received his PhD in Sociology from Indiana University. His research addresses the mechanisms that manufacture and maintain racial and social inequality. His work also speaks to ways that inequality may be attenuated through racial uplift activism and social policy. He is the author of Race and Ethnic Relations in the 21st Century: History, Theory, Institutions, and Policy. His work has appeared in journals including the Annual Review of Public Health, Journal of Urban Health, American Education Research Journal, Ethnic and Racial Studies, and the Journal of Contemporary Ethnography. Ray has two forthcoming books: The Loves Jones Cohort: Single and Living Alone in the Black Middle Class with Dr. Kris Marsh and Bordering Chaos: Family and Work in a Racially-Diverse America with Dr. Pam Jackson. Dr. Ray has been awarded funding from the National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Ford Foundation, American Sociological Association Minority Fellowship Program, and the Society for the Study of Social Problems. Ray was selected as 40 Under 40 Prince George’s County in 2014, Outstanding Black Male Leader of Tomorrow for the city of Bloomington, IN in 2010, and the Co-Chair of the Ford Foundation Scholars Conference in 2015. He has been awarded mentorship awards from the Philip Merrill Presidential Scholars Program, Ronald E. McNair Post-Baccalaureate Program, and the Departments of Sociology at the University of Maryland and Indiana University. Previously, Dr. Ray served on the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington Planning Committee and the Commission on Racial Justice with Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. Currently, he serves on the editorial boards for Sociology of Race and Ethnicity and Social Psychology Quarterly as well as the American Sociological Association Committee on the Status of Racial and Ethnic Minorities in Sociology. Dr. Ray is a frequent contributor to the New York Times and has also written for Huffington Post.

Discipline: Sociology