Health Disparities and Inequalities - Inter-generational transmission of health status

Karen R. Albright Ph.D.

Cohort 11 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology and Criminology, Affiliated Faculty in the Graduate School of Social Work
University of Denver, Denver, CO

Dr. Albright received her PhD in Sociology from New York University. Dr. Albright’s research interests focus on health behaviors among socioeconomically disadvantaged populations, the barriers to their care, and potential solutions for improving care (e.g., collaborations between public health entities and private practices). In recent years, she has become particularly interested in how distrust of pharmaceutical medicine and the U.S. health care system affects health behaviors and outcomes. Dr. Albright’s research has been published in a wide variety of social scientific and medical journals, including American Journal of Public Health, Academic Pediatrics, Sociological Forum, and American Behavioral Scientist. Her research has been funded by, among others, the National Institutes of Health, the Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute, and the National Science Foundation. She is the Vice-President Elect of the Association for Applied and Clinical Sociology. 

Discipline: Sociology
		

Megan Andrew Ph.D.

Cohort 16 — Michigan Alumni List
Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology
University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN

Dr. Andrew received her PhD from the University of Wisconsin, Madison in 2009.  Her research focuses on the intergenerational and social psychological determinants of young adults’ education and health attainments.  In previous research, she has evaluated the intergenerational impacts of serious health events in the parent generation, the life course production of education and health attainments among youth and young adults, and the association between socioeconomic segregation and infant health.  Her research has been published in Social Forces, American Journal of Public Health, Social Science Research, Sociological Methodology, and more.  Her research has been funded by the Spencer Foundation, the University of Michigan’s Center for Integrative Approaches to Health Disparities, and Stanford University’s Center on Poverty and Inequality.  

Discipline: Sociology
		

Dalton Conley Ph.D.

Cohort 3 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Henry Putnam University Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology
Princeton University, Princeton, NJ

Dr. Conley received his PhD in sociology from Columbia University in 1996 and a PhD in Biology (Genomics) from NYU in 2014. His research focuses on how socio-economic status and health are transmitted across generations and on the public policies that affect those processes. He studies sibling differences in socioeconomic success; racial inequalities; the measurement of class; and how health and biology affect (and are affected by) social position. His publications include Being Black, Living in the Red; The Starting GateHonky; The Pecking Order; You May Ask Yourself; and Parentology. He is a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and has been the recipient of Guggenheim, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Russell Sage Foundation fellowships as well as a CAREER award and the Alan T. Waterman Award of the National Science Foundation.

 

His current work applies econometric methods for causal inference--namely, a natural experiment framework--to genome-wide data available in social surveys to model gene-by-environment interaction effects.  Examples in this vein include deploying the Vietnam draft lottery, twin differences in birth weight, exogenous job loss (such as plant closure), and sibling differences in genotype (polygenic scores) to questions of health, development and socioeconomic attainment across the life course.  I am also interested in mapping the genetic architecture of phenotypic plasticity, interrogating the assumptions underlying models for heritability, and characterizing social and genetic sorting as distinct processes.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Eric A.Feldman Ph.D.

Cohort 1 — Yale Alumni List
Professor of Law, School of Law
Professor of Medical Ethics and Health Policy
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Dr. Feldman received both his PhD and JD from the University of California-Berkeley and his Bachelor of Arts degree from Vassar.  His expertise is in Japanese law, comparative public health law, and law and society. His books and articles explore the comparative dimensions of rights, dispute resolution, and legal culture, often in the context of urgent policy issues including the regulation of smoking, HIV/AIDS, and other aspects of the health care system. Feldman has twice been a Fulbright Scholar in Japan, and has also been a Visiting Professor at the Institut d’Etudes Politiques in Paris and at the University of Trento in Italy, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Waseda University’s Graduate School of Law in Tokyo. He has received grants and fellowships from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the American Bar Association, the National Science Foundation, and the Social Science Research Council, among others. Prior to joining the Penn Law faculty, he spent five years as the Associate Director of the Institute for Law and Society at New York University. He is the author of The Ritual of Rights in Japan: Law, Society, and Health Policy (Cambridge University Press, 2000), the co-editor of Blood Feuds: AIDS, Blood, and the Politics of Medical Disaster (Oxford University Press, 1999) and Unfiltered: Conflicts over Tobacco Policy and Public Health (Harvard University Press, 2004), and has published academic articles in edited volumes and journals including the California Law Review, Law in Japan, American Journal of Comparative Law, Los Angeles Times, Social and Legal Studies, Hastings Center Report, Lancet, Law and Society Review, and the Michigan Journal of International Law.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Erica M. Field Ph.D.

Cohort 10 — Harvard Alumni List
Professor, Department of Economics & Global Health
Duke University, Durham, NC

Dr. Field received her PhD in Economics from Princeton University. Dr. Field’s major fields of interests are development economics, labor economics, economic demography, and health. Specifically, her research focuses on the areas of marriage and family, property rights, global health, and finance and entrepreneurship. She has received grants from the National Science Foundation, Agricultural Technology Adoption Initiative, and the Harvard Sustainability Science Program, among others. She has published work in various journals, including the American Economics Journal and the Quarterly Journal of Economics. She is currently working on projects that explore adolescent empowerment and education in Bangladesh, the effects of micro-finance on women and households in South Asia and India, and the impacts of access to family planning resources on fertility and health in Zambia.

Discipline: Economics