Health Care Policymaking

Elizabeth M. Armstrong Ph.D., M.P.A.

Cohort 5 — Michigan Alumni List
Associate Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs, Department of Sociology and Woodrow Wilson School of Public & International Affairs
Princeton University, Princeton , NJ

Dr. Armstrong has a PhD from the University of Pennsylvania and a MPA from Princeton University. Her research interests in public health, the history and sociology of medicine, social determinants of health, and medical ethics. She is the author of Conceiving Risk, Bearing Responsibility: Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and the Diagnosis of Moral Disorder (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003) and articles on family planning, medical mistakes, adolescent motherhood, and the sociology of pregnancy and birth. Her current research includes a longitudinal study of agenda setting around disease in the U.S. and a study of fetal personhood and obstetrical ethics. She holds a joint appointment in the department of sociology and the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University and is a faculty associate at both the Office of Population Research and the Center for Health and Wellbeing there.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Jeb Barnes J.D., Ph.D.

Cohort 10 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Political Science
Director of Graduate Studies
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

Dr. Barnes received his PhD from the University of California-Berkeley, a J.D. Law degree from the University of Chicago, Law School and a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of California-Berkeley. His research generally focuses on the intersection between law, politics, and public policy and appears in a wide range of peer-reviewed journals, including thePolitical Research Quarterly, Law & Society Review, Law & Social Inquiry, Annual Review of Political Science, and Justice Systems Journal.  He has published two books: Overruled? Legislative Overrides, Pluralism, and Contemporary Court-Congress Relations (Stanford 2004) and a co-edited volume, Making Policy, Making Law: An Interbranch Perspective (Georgetown 2004).  He is currently finishing a short book on the recent failure of asbestos litigation reform in Congress, which is entitled Trying to Settle the Dust: Asbestos Litigation Reform and the Politics of Inefficiency in Contemporary American Politics.  His next project (with Thomas F. Burke, another Program alumnus) explores the political implications of relying on litigation versus social insurance programs to address injury compensation issues.  It is under contract with Oxford University Press.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Christopher J. Bonastia Ph.D.

Cohort 8 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
Lehman College and CUNY Graduate Center, Bronx, NY

Dr. Bonastia received his Ph.D. from New York University in 2001.  Dr. Bonastia’s work focuses on historical explorations of race, policy and politics.  His first book, Knocking on the Door: The Federal Government’s Attempt to Desegregate the Suburbs, was published in 2006 by Princeton University Press.  His recent book, Southern Stalemate: Five Years without Public Education in Prince Edward County, Virginia, was published in early 2012 by the University of Chicago Press.  The latter project was funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.  In summer 2011, he was a visiting fellow at the NEH Summer Institute for College and University Teachers at Harvard University.  His work has also been published in the Journal of Policy History (examining civil rights enforcement in health care), the Du Bois Review, Social Science History and Social Problems, among other publications.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Graeme T. Boushey Ph.D.

Cohort 17 — Michigan Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Political Science
University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA

Dr. Boushey received a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Washington in 2007.  His research focuses on public policy innovation and political decision-making in America. His book Policy Diffusion Dynamics in America (Cambridge University Press, 2010), integrates research from agenda setting and epidemiology to model factors that shape the speed and scope of public policy diffusion. As a Scholar, he explored how American state governments respond to complex health policy threats, initially focusing on state vaccination and tobacco control programs.  He also initiated a related project on rulemaking in state public health agencies.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Thomas F. Burke Ph.D.

Cohort 8 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Professor, Department of Political Science
Wellesley College, Wellesley, MA

Dr. Burke received both his PhD and MA from the University of California-Berkeley. He received his Bachelor of Arts from University of Minnesota. He has been a visiting professor at Harvard and at the University of California-Berkeley, and a research fellow at the Brookings Institution and with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Scholars in Health Policy Program.  Dr. Burke’s research focuses on the place of rights and litigation in public policy. His most recent project, with USC Professor (and RWJF Scholars in Health Policy Research alum) Jeb Barnes, examines the politics of injury compensation in the United States. Another project, also with Barnes, analyzes how organizations respond to social change laws. The first article from this project, “The Diffusion of Rights,” was published in the fall, 2006 issue of Law and Society Review. Other recent publications include: “Political Regimes and the Future of the First Amendment,” in Studies in Law, Politics and Society; "Is There an Empirical Literature on Rights?" forthcoming from that same journal; and "The Bush Administration and the Uses of Judicial Politics," with co-author Nancy Scherer, a chapter in an edited volume on the Bush Presidency. Dr. Burke is the co-author, with Lief Carter, of the updated 9th edition of Reason in Law (2016), and the author of Lawyers, Lawsuits and Legal Rights: The Struggle Over Litigation in American Society (2002).

Discipline: Political Science
		

Tim Bϋthe Ph.D.

Cohort 14 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Sanford School of Public Policy
Senior Fellow, Rethinking Regulation Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics
Duke University, Durham, NC

Dr. Buthe received his B.A. in Government, History, and Economics from Harvard in 1995, and his Ph.D. in Political Science from Columbia University in 2002.  His primary research interests are the evolution and persistence of institutions and the ways in which institutions enable and constrain actors.  Substantively, his work focuses primarily on the politics of standards & regulations and what he calls global private politics.  His work has been published in the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political ScienceGovernance, Law & Contemporary Problems, and other journals, as well as edited volumes (see www.buthe.info for details).  A major study of the domestic and international politics of setting standards for product and financial markets, including standards for medical instruments/devices, is forthcoming with Princeton University Press--based on multi-industry surveys in the U.S. and several European countries.  As a RWJF Scholar, he studied the standardization of medical terminology and the political contestation over the technology for electronic medical records, as well as the delegation of regulatory authority in the realm of food safety.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Reid Cushman Ph.D.

Cohort 2 — Yale Alumni List
Director, Technology Development, CITI Program
Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine
University of Miami, Miami, FL

Dr. Cushman received his PhD in Government, a MAPA, MA and BA from the University of Virginia. Dr. Cushman received his training in economics, political science and public policy at the University of Virginia.  Prior to coming to UM, he was a lecturer at the Goldman School of Public Policy at the University of California - Berkeley.  His teaching background includes courses in ethics and public policy, health care economics, health care policy, political philosophy, public health ethics and law, science and technology policy, and statistics and research methods, at UC-Berkeley, UM, UVa, and other universities. He currently teaches in UM’s Health Executive MBA program, the MSCTI Program, and the Public Health MPH/PhD program.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Kevin M. Esterling Ph.D.

Cohort 7 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Professor of Political Science and Public Policy, Department of Political Science and School of Public Policy
Associate Dean of the Graduate Division
University of California, Riverside, Riverside, CA

Dr. Esterling received his PhD from University of Chicago. His research focuses on deliberative democracy in American national politics. His current work identifies the conditions that lead citizens to engage constructively in public discourse. He is the author of The Political Economy of Expertise: Information and Efficiency in American National Politics (University of Michigan Press, 2004). He has published in a number of journals, including The American Political Science Review, Political Analysis, The Journal of Politics, Rationality and Society, Political Communication, and the Journal of Theoretical Politics. His work has been funded by the National Science Foundation and by the MacArthur Foundation. Esterling was a postdoctoral research fellow at the A. Alfred Taubman Center for Public Policy and American Institutions at Brown University.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Laura E. Evans Ph.D.

Cohort 14 — Harvard Alumni List
Associate Professor of Public Affairs, Daniel J. Evans School of Public Affairs
University of Washington, Seattle, WA

Dr. Evans received her PhD in Political Science from the University of Michigan. Dr. Evans joined the Evans School faculty in 2004. She studies the politics of American federalism. Dr. Evans explores the determinants of regional policy coordination and competition, with particular attention to institutional arrangements and racial and economic inequality. Her recent book, Power from Powerlessness: Tribal Governments, Institutional Niches, and American Federalism (2011, Oxford University Press), examines American Indian tribal governments’ relations with states, localities, and the federal government. Dr. Evans shows how American Indian tribal governments sometimes succeed, often against dim odds, in persuading state and local governments to address important tribal concerns. She shows that even when opportunities for major federal policy change are limited, tribes have built particular types of supportive relationships—which she terms institutional niches—that help with cultivating political capacity. She offers new ideas about the interplay of political institutions and the politics of marginalized groups. Dr. Evans is writing a book on agenda-setting in suburbs, tentatively titled, Ailing Agendas, Fractured Frames? Understanding the Politics of (In)Equality in America’s Suburbs.  She evaluates the frames that suburban officials deploy to justify policies of exclusion, efficiency, or equity. She identifies uniquely suburban frames and agendas and their ramifications for American politics. In several other articles, she has analyzed how state legislatures govern local affairs. Also, she has begun new work on institutional change in federal Indian policy over the 20th century.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Erika Franklin Fowler Ph.D.

Cohort 14 — Michigan Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Government
Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT

Dr. Fowler received a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Wisconsin – Madison.  Dr. Fowler’s dissertation provides one of the first systematic examinations of both the content and effect of local television news coverage of elections.  As a Scholar, she studied the emergence and evolution of competitive framing surrounding HPV-related policy action in local media and how publicized controversy may have shaped public decisions about and confidence in vaccination and immunization programs more generally. She also worked on another project examining variation in health news across outlets with a particular focus on whether media diminish or exacerbate existing inequalities. 

Discipline: Political Science