Comparison of National Health Care Systems

Thomas F. Burke (ext. site) Ph.D.

Cohort 8 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Professor, Department of Political Science
Wellesley College, Wellesley, MA

Dr. Burke received both his PhD and MA from the University of California-Berkeley. He received his Bachelor of Arts from University of Minnesota. He has been a visiting professor at Harvard and at the University of California-Berkeley, and a research fellow at the Brookings Institution and with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Scholars in Health Policy Program.  Dr. Burke’s research focuses on the place of rights and litigation in public policy. His most recent project, with USC Professor (and RWJF Scholars in Health Policy Research alum) Jeb Barnes, examines the politics of injury compensation in the United States. Another project, also with Barnes, analyzes how organizations respond to social change laws. The first article from this project, “The Diffusion of Rights,” was published in the fall, 2006 issue of Law and Society Review. Other recent publications include: “Political Regimes and the Future of the First Amendment,” in Studies in Law, Politics and Society; "Is There an Empirical Literature on Rights?" forthcoming from that same journal; and "The Bush Administration and the Uses of Judicial Politics," with co-author Nancy Scherer, a chapter in an edited volume on the Bush Presidency. Dr. Burke is the co-author, with Lief Carter, of the updated 9th edition of Reason in Law (2016), and the author of Lawyers, Lawsuits and Legal Rights: The Struggle Over Litigation in American Society (2002).

Discipline: Political Science
		

Tim Bϋthe Ph.D.

Cohort 14 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Sanford School of Public Policy
Senior Fellow, Rethinking Regulation Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics
Duke University, Durham, NC

Dr. Buthe received his B.A. in Government, History, and Economics from Harvard in 1995, and his Ph.D. in Political Science from Columbia University in 2002.  His primary research interests are the evolution and persistence of institutions and the ways in which institutions enable and constrain actors.  Substantively, his work focuses primarily on the politics of standards & regulations and what he calls global private politics.  His work has been published in the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political ScienceGovernance, Law & Contemporary Problems, and other journals, as well as edited volumes (see www.buthe.info for details).  A major study of the domestic and international politics of setting standards for product and financial markets, including standards for medical instruments/devices, is forthcoming with Princeton University Press--based on multi-industry surveys in the U.S. and several European countries.  As a RWJF Scholar, he studied the standardization of medical terminology and the political contestation over the technology for electronic medical records, as well as the delegation of regulatory authority in the realm of food safety.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Susan M. Giaimo Doctorate

Cohort 1 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Adjunct Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science and Biomedical Sciences
Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI

Dr. Giaimo received her Doctorate in Political Science from University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dr. Giaimo's research and teaching interests comprise comparative politics of advanced industrial societies, comparative public policy, comparative political economy, and health care politics and policy. She taught in the political science department at MIT.

Dr. Giaimo’s latest book is Reforming Health Care in the United States, Germany, and South Africa: Comparative Perspectives on Health (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015). She has also published journal articles and book chapters on comparative welfare state policies and health care politics. Dr. Giaimo has been panelist on a number of public forums on health policy, including the local PBS program 4th Street Forum and the Milwaukee Press Club. Her publications include Markets and Medicine: The Politics of Health Care Reform in Britain, Germany, and the United States (University of Michigan Press, 2002), and journal articles in Comparative Political Studies and Governance.  Her next book, Comparative Politics of Health: United States, Germany, Canada, and South Africa, will be published by Palgrave Macmillan.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Drew T. Halfmann Ph.D.

Cohort 8 — Michigan Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
University of California, Davis, Davis, CA

Dr. Halfmann received both his PhD and MA in Sociology from New York University in 2001, and his Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and Economics from the University of Wisconsin in 1990. His research focuses on social movements and the politics of health and social policy.  Professor Halfmann is the author of Doctors and Demonstrators: How Political Institutions Shape Abortion Law in the United States, Britain and Canada (University of Chicago Press, 2011), which won the 2012 Charles Tilly Best Book Award from the Section on Collective Behavior and Social Movements of the American Sociological Association. His research has appeared in the American Sociological Review, Social Problems, Mobilization, HEALTH, Studies in American Political Development, and the Journal of Policy History.  His current research is on the African-American struggle for health equality from Reconstruction to Obamacare.  He is a member of the Scholars Strategy Network and co-director of its Bay Area Regional Network. 

Discipline: Sociology
		

Abigail C. Saguy Ph.D.

Cohort 7 — Yale Alumni List
Professor, Department of Sociology
Associate Professor, Department of Women’s Studies
University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA

Dr. Saguy received both her PhD and MA in Sociology from Princeton University and her Bachelor of Arts degree from College of Letters, Wesleyan Univeresity. My teaching and research interests include gender, culture, the body, politics, law and public health. Her interest also include in how cultural schemas shape power relations and how subordinate groups are sometimes able to create new cultural meaning to increase their control. She pursued these interests through my comparative research on sexual harassment definitions and on framing contests over fatness. In these “hot” or highly contested topics, social actors make their cultural assumptions explicit, making them ideally suited to cultural analysis. In her work, she used multiple methods and cross-national, cross-issue, and cross-institutional comparisons. In recent years, the “obesity epidemic” has emerged as a top public health concern in the United States and abroad. Scholars, journalists, and politicians alike are scrambling to find answers. What or who is responsible for this crisis and what can be done to stop it? In contrast, in What's Wrong with Fat? (WWwF?) She argues that these fraught debates obscure more important sociological questions: How has fatness come to be understood as a public health crisis at all? Why has the view of fatness as a medical problem and public health crisis come to dominate more positive framings of weight – as consistent with health, beauty, or a legitimate rights claim—in public discourse? Why are heavy individuals singled out for blame? And what are the consequences of understanding weight in these ways? Building on WWwF?, she conducted a series of ongoing experments with David Frederick (Psychology, Chapman University) that examine the effect of reading different news articles about body weight have on attitudes about health, health policy, and weight-based prejudice. In a collaboration with French sociologists Henri Bergeron and Patrick Castell, she is investigating the extent to which frames shape policy, focusing specifically on the case of French obesity policy. Her latest book is "What's Wrong with Fat? (2013, Oxford University Press) and What is Sexual Harassment? From Capitol Hill to the Sorbonne (2003, University of California Press).

Discipline: Sociology
		

Adam D. Sheingate Ph.D.

Cohort 9 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Political Science
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD

Dr. Scheingate received both his PhD and MA in Political Science from Yale University. His research interest is American Politics. His most recent book is Building a Business of Politics: The Rise of Political Consulting and the Transformation of American Democracy. He is also a co-editor of the Oxford Handbook of Historical Institutionalism and the author of the Rise of the Agricultural Welfare State: Institutions and Interest Group Power in the United States, France, and Japan as well as journal articles and book chapters on American political development, historical institutionalism, and comparative public policy.

Discipline: Political Science