Child and Infant Health and Health Care (including insurance programs)

Elizabeth M. Armstrong Ph.D., M.P.A.

Cohort 5 — Michigan Alumni List
Associate Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs, Department of Sociology and Woodrow Wilson School of Public & International Affairs
Princeton University, Princeton , NJ

Dr. Armstrong has a PhD from the University of Pennsylvania and a MPA from Princeton University. Her research interests in public health, the history and sociology of medicine, social determinants of health, and medical ethics. She is the author of Conceiving Risk, Bearing Responsibility: Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and the Diagnosis of Moral Disorder (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003) and articles on family planning, medical mistakes, adolescent motherhood, and the sociology of pregnancy and birth. Her current research includes a longitudinal study of agenda setting around disease in the U.S. and a study of fetal personhood and obstetrical ethics. She holds a joint appointment in the department of sociology and the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University and is a faculty associate at both the Office of Population Research and the Center for Health and Wellbeing there.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Reagan A. Baughman Ph.D.

Cohort 8 — Michigan Alumni List
John A. Hogan Distinguished Professor in Economics and Associate Professor of Economics, Peter T. Paul College of Business and Economics
University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH

Dr. Baughman received her bachelor’s degree in economics (with a minor in French) from Drew University in Madison, NJ and her Ph.D. in Economics from Syracuse University. She has been a faculty member at the University of New Hampshire since 2003, teaching undergraduate students in microeconomic theory courses, labor economics and public finance, and graduate students in health economics and research workshops. During the time she has been at UNH, she has spent time visiting two public policy organizations. She served as a Visiting Scholar at the New England Public Policy Center of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston during the summer of 2007 and as a Visiting Fellow at the U.S. Congressional Budget Office in Washington, DC from September 2009 to July 2010. Her favorite experience to date as a UNH professor has been accompanying 27 business and economics students to study at Corvinus University in Budapest during the Fall 2007 semester. While in Budapest, she taught a course in health economics to a group of students from 8 different countries and traveled with UNH students in Hungary, Slovakia and Poland.

Discipline: Economics
		

Glenn D. Beamer Ph.D.

Cohort 4 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor of Health Policy, Department of Health Policy and Public Health, Mayes College
Director, Master of Public Health Program
University of the Sciences, Philadelphia, PA

Dr. Beamer PhD and MA in political science from the University of Michigan. He received a BA from the College of William & Mary. Before joining University of the Sciences, he served as Director of the Margaret Chase Smith Policy Center at the University of Maine. He has also served as Assistant Professor of Public Policy at The Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy at Rutgers University. Dr. Beamer's teaching focuses on health policy, community health and development, and community-based health research. His research interest includes community health and development, as well as health policy issues related to children. He is currently working on a worker-based model for community development and retirement security, and a comparative evaluation of state-level welfare and health policy reform efforts.

Discipline: Political Science
Research Interests:
		

Sharon H. Bzostek Ph.D.

Cohort 16 — Harvard Alumni List
Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology
Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ

Dr. Bzostek received her PhD in sociology from Princeton University in 2009. Her primary research interests are in the fields of family demography, childhood inequality, and health disparities. Current research projects include a study of differential self-rating of health by race/ethnicity, an analysis of child health disparities resulting from instability in family structure, a study of the patterns and consequences of health insurance coverage among children in the same family, and an investigation of differences in maternal and paternal reports of children’s health status.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Dalton Conley Ph.D.

Cohort 3 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Henry Putnam University Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology
Princeton University, Princeton, NJ

Dr. Conley received his PhD in sociology from Columbia University in 1996 and a PhD in Biology (Genomics) from NYU in 2014. His research focuses on how socio-economic status and health are transmitted across generations and on the public policies that affect those processes. He studies sibling differences in socioeconomic success; racial inequalities; the measurement of class; and how health and biology affect (and are affected by) social position. His publications include Being Black, Living in the Red; The Starting GateHonky; The Pecking Order; You May Ask Yourself; and Parentology. He is a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and has been the recipient of Guggenheim, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Russell Sage Foundation fellowships as well as a CAREER award and the Alan T. Waterman Award of the National Science Foundation.

 

His current work applies econometric methods for causal inference--namely, a natural experiment framework--to genome-wide data available in social surveys to model gene-by-environment interaction effects.  Examples in this vein include deploying the Vietnam draft lottery, twin differences in birth weight, exogenous job loss (such as plant closure), and sibling differences in genotype (polygenic scores) to questions of health, development and socioeconomic attainment across the life course.  I am also interested in mapping the genetic architecture of phenotypic plasticity, interrogating the assumptions underlying models for heritability, and characterizing social and genetic sorting as distinct processes.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Seth M. Freedman Ph.D.

Cohort 17 — Michigan Alumni List
Assistant Professor, School of Public and Environmental Affairs
Indiana University, Bloomington, IN

Dr. Freedman received his PhD from the University of Maryland Department of Economics. His research primarily focuses on the causes and effects of technology diffusion and utilization in health care, including the effects of insurance expansion on hospital technology adoption, the effects of financial incentives on technology use, and the effects of electronic medical records on patient outcomes. His work has been published in journals such as the Review of Economics and Statistics and Advances in Health Economics and Health Services Research, and he has received funding from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. 

Discipline: Economics
		

David Frisvold Ph.D.

Cohort 13 — Michigan Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Economics
University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA

Dr. Frisvold received his PhD in Economics from Vanderbilt University and his Bachelor of Science in Mathemathical Economics from Wake Forest University. Professor Frisvold’s research interests include health economics and the economics of education. He is interested in understanding whether and how public policies targeted towards children influence their health and education outcomes, and his research specifically focuses on childhood obesity, soft drink taxes, early childhood education, school quality, and food assistance programs.

His research has been published in leading economics and health policy journals including Journal of Public Economics, Journal of Health Economics, Journal of Human Resources, and Health Affairs and has been funded by various institutes and organizations including the NIH, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, University of Kentucky Center for Poverty Research, University of California Davis Center for Poverty Research, and Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin.
 

Discipline: Economics
		

Kristen S. Harknett Ph.D.

Cohort 9 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Dr. Harknett received her PhD in Sociology and Demography from Princeton University in 2002. Her research is motivated by the sociological contention that a person's social environment influences his or her most personal and important decisions, sometimes in ways that may not be apparent to the individuals involved. She demonstrates this idea by studying the role of context – city of residence, school, or labor market – in shaping romantic relationships. Her research shows that male shortages and weak labor markets act as impediments to stable romantic relationships. One innovation in her research is to demonstrate that male shortages matter not only during the process of searching for a romantic partner, but they also influence the dynamics and trajectories of relationships that have already formed. In a second line of research, she investigates the importance of “private safety nets” comprised of supportive family members and friends. In this research, she examines how social support is unevenly distributed across individuals, and the consequences of lacking social support. Some of the topics she explores include the bi-directional relationship between fertility and social support, the correlation between personal and social network disadvantages, and the relationship between social support and psychological and material well-being.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Seema Jayachandran Ph.D.

Cohort 11 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Economics
Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

Dr. Jayachandran received her PhD and MA from Harvard University in Ecomomics and Physics respectively. She also received a MA from the University of Oxford in Physics and Philosophy, and her Bachelor of Arts from MIT.

Dr. Jayachandran's received publications include: “Why Are Indian Children So Short?  The Role of Birth Order and Son Preference” (with R. Pande), American Economic Review, forthcoming, September 2017, “Cash for Carbon: A Randomized Trial of Payments for Ecosystem Services to Reduce Deforestation” (with J. De Laat, E. Lambin, C. Stanton, R. Audy, and N. Thomas), Science, 357(6348), July 2017, pp. 267–273, “Mothers Care More,  But Fathers Decide:  Educating Parents about Child Health in Uganda,”  (with M. Bjorkman Nyqvist), American Economic Review Papers and Proceedings, 107(5), May 2017, pp. 496-500 “Fertility Decline and Missing Women,” American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 9(1), January 2017, pp. 118-139, “Friendship at Work:  Can Peer Support Catalyze Female Entrepreneurship?”  (with E. Field, N. Rigol, and R. Pande), American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, 8(2), May 2016, pp. 125-153, “The Roots of Gender Inequality in Developing Countries” Annual Review of Economics, vol. 7, 2015, pp. 63-88, “Does Contraceptive Use Always Reduce Breastfeeding?” Demography, 51(3), June 2014, pp. 917-937, “Incentives to Teach Badly:  After-School Tutoring in Developing Countries,” Journal of Development Economics, 108, May 2014, pp. 190-205.

Her affiliations include: Research Associate, National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), Board Member and Co-Chair of Health Sector, Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL), Board Member and Fellow, Bureau for Research and Economic Analysis of Development (BREAD), Other affiliations: Centre for Economic Policy Research, International Growth Centre, Innovations for Poverty Action, Institute for Policy Research.
 

Discipline: Economics
		

Douglas L. Miller Ph.D.

Cohort 7 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Professor, Department of Policy Analysis and Management
Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

Dr. Miller received his PhD (Economics) and MA (Economics) both from Princeton University, and his Bachelor of Arts degree in Mathematics from UC Santa Cruz. He is a micro-economist, with research interests in social policy.  Dr. Miller is especially interested in policies that impact demographically and economically vulnerable populations.  He is also interested in the relationship between the economic environment and health outcomes.  Dr. Miller's research works to build and expand the econometric toolkit used to answer social science and public policy questions. Before joining PAM, I was a member of the Economics Department at UC Davis from 2002-2016.

Discipline: Economics