Access to Health Care (includes: cultural/language, financial, geographical, organizational)

Karen R. Albright (ext. site) Ph.D.

Cohort 11 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology and Criminology, Affiliated Faculty in the Graduate School of Social Work
University of Denver, Denver, CO

Dr. Albright received her PhD in Sociology from New York University. Dr. Albright’s research interests focus on health behaviors among socioeconomically disadvantaged populations, the barriers to their care, and potential solutions for improving care (e.g., collaborations between public health entities and private practices). In recent years, she has become particularly interested in how distrust of pharmaceutical medicine and the U.S. health care system affects health behaviors and outcomes. Dr. Albright’s research has been published in a wide variety of social scientific and medical journals, including American Journal of Public Health, Academic Pediatrics, Sociological Forum, and American Behavioral Scientist. Her research has been funded by, among others, the National Institutes of Health, the Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute, and the National Science Foundation. She is the Vice-President Elect of the Association for Applied and Clinical Sociology. 

Discipline: Sociology
		

Michael K. Gusmano Ph.D.

Cohort 2 — Yale Alumni List
Associate Professor of Health Policy, School of Public Health
Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ

Dr. Gusmano received his PhD in Political Sciene from the University of New York at Albany. He is also a Research Scholar at The Hastings Center where he investigates health care equity in the U.S. and other countries. He has published widely in the areas of health policy, aging, and comparative welfare state analysis – including his book with Colleen Grogan, Healthy Voices/Unhealthy Silence: Advocating for Poor People’s Health (Georgetown University Press, 2007). He is the co-director of the World Cities Project (WCP) - the first effort to compare the performance of health, social and long-term care systems in New York, London, Paris and Tokyo - the four largest cities among the wealthy nations of the world. He is a member of the Gerontological Society of American and the American Political Science Association (APSA) and serves as the secretary of APSA’s Organized Section on Health Politics and Policy. He is also a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Hahrie C. Han Ph.D.

Cohort 16 — Harvard Alumni List
Anton Vonk Professor of Political Science, Department of Political Science
University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA

Dr, Han received her PhD in Political Science from Stanford University in 2005. From 2005-2015, she was an Associate Professor of Political Science at Wellesley College. She specializes in the politics of environmental and social policy, focusing particularly on the role that civic associations play in mobilizing participation in politics and policy advocacy. Her recently published book, How Organizations Develop Activists: Civic Associations and Leadership in the 21st Century (Oxford University Press 2014) examines the strategies that the most effective civic associations use to engage activists and develop civic leaders in health and environmental politics. Another book, Groundbreakers: How Obama's 2.1 Million Activists Transformed Field Campaigns in America (co-authored with Elizabeth McKenna, Oxford Univ. Press 2014) describes the strategies the 2008 and 2012 Obama campaign used to engage so many grassroots activists in communities across America. Her first book, Moved to Action: Motivation, Participation, and Inequality in American Politics (Stanford University Press, 2009) examined the ways in which people become motivated to participate in politics, looking particularly at means of engaging underprivileged populations in political action. The book was the subject of a series of “Critical Dialogues” in Perspectives on Politics, an Author-Meets-Critics panel at the Southern Political Science Association, and positive reviews elsewhere.

Discipline: Political Science
		

Mireille Jacobson Ph.D.

Cohort 11 — Michigan Alumni List
Associate Professor of Economics and Public Policy, The Paul Merage School of Business
Director, Center for Health Care Management and Policy
University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA

Dr. Jacobsen received her PhD from Harvard University in 2001. Dr. Jacobson’s research focuses broadly on access to timely and appropriate health care, hospital behavior and the impact of Medicare payment policies on physician treatment decisions.  Her research has been published in leading economics and health journals, such as the Quarterly Journal of Economics and the New England Journal of Medicine. Dr. Jacobson’s work has been funded by the National Cancer Institute, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Changes in Health Care Financing and Organization (HCFO) program, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the National Institute on Drug Abuse. As a health economist and nationally recognized expert on Medicare cancer payment policy. She has received grants from the National Insititute on Aging, the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute on Child Health and Development, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Commonwealth Fund. She is a research associate in the Health Care program at the National Bureau of Economic Research and a fellow at the Center for Economics and Social Research at USC. Prior to joining the Merage School, she was a senior health economist at the RAND Corporation, the Deputy Director of RAND Health's Economics, Finance, and Organization (EFO) Program, and a professor at the Pardee RAND Graduate School. She is currently working with several states and localities to develop effective ways to address the current opioid epidemic.

Discipline: Economics
		

Tiffany D. Joseph Ph.D.

Cohort 18 — Harvard Alumni List
Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology
Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY

Dr. Joseph received her PhD in Sociology from the University of Michigan and Bachelor of Arts degree from Brown University. Dr. Joseph's reearch interests include the influence of immigration on the social construction of race in the U.S., immigrants' health and healthcare access; immigration and health policy, and the experiences of minority faculty in academia. Her current project explores how race and documentation status influences the healthcare access of immigrants under comprehensive health reform.  Her latest book, "Race on the Move" was published by Stanford University Press (2015).

Discipline: Sociology
		

Catherine Lee Ph.D.

Cohort 10 — Michigan Alumni List
Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ

Dr. Lee received her PhD in Sociology from the University of California, Los Angeles. She examines how meanings of race and ethnicity shape social relations and inequalities across three critical sites: immigration; science and medicine; and law and society. Catherine is the author of Fictive Kinship: Family Reunification and the Meaning of Race and Nation in American Immigration (2013, Russell Sage) and co-editor of Genetics and the Unsettled Past: The Collision of DNA, Race, and History (2012, Rutgers University Press). Her current projects include an investigation of racial disparities in pain management and the politics of narcotics control and a study of how social institutions are addressing ideas of racial ambiguity or uncertainty tied to shifting demographics and rise of multi-raciality.

Discipline: Sociology
		

Jamila Michener Ph.D.

Cohort 18 — Michigan Alumni List
Assistant Professor, Department of Government
Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

Dr. Michener received her PhD in Political Science from the University of Michigan. She is interested in race and public policy in the United States. Her research has been supported by the Russell Sage Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Ford Foundation.

Her research aims to identify: 1) the conditions under which economically and racially marginalized groups engage in the political process and 2) the many ways public policy shapes the lives of people in these groups. Particular topics that animate this agenda include: the political causes of racial disparities in poverty rates; the effects of state policies on the political behavior of people living in poverty; the relationship between neighborhood disorder and local political participation; the determinants of state compliance with the public assistance provisions (section 7) of the National Voter Registration Act; and the community level political effects of concentrated disadvantage.

Her academic work has been published or is forthcoming in Political Behavior, the Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law, Poverty and Public Policy and the Forum. Dr. Michener's (forthcoming) book with Cambridge University Press is entitled, Fragmented Democracy: Medicaid, Federalism, and Unequal Politics. Her public writing has been featured in the New York Times, the Washington Post and the American Prospect.

In addition to writing and research, she is a co-leader of the Finger Lakes Branch of the Scholars Strategy Network, a faculty affiliate at the Center for the Study of Inequality, a graduate field faculty member in the Africana Studies Department, a faculty affiliate in the American Studies Program and an affiliate at the Cornell Population Center. She also sits on the advisory board of the Cornell Prison Education Program and teach classes in local prisons.

Discipline: Political Science
		

David N. Pellow Ph.D.

Cohort 5 — Berkeley/UCSF Alumni List
Dehlsen Chair and Professor of Environmental Studies, Department of Environmental Studies
University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA

Dr. Pellow received both his PhD and MA in Sociology from Northwestern University. He has published a number of works on environmental justice issues in communities of color in the U.S. and globally. His books includeKeywords for Environmental Studies.( with Adamson, Joni, William A. Gleason, Eds., New York University Press, Forthcoming), Total Liberation: The Power and Promise of AnimalRights and the Radical Earth Movement (University of Minnesota Press, 2014), The Slums of Aspen: Immigrants versus the Environment in America’s Eden. (August 2011, with Lisa Sun-Hee Park, New York University Press); The Treadmill of Production: Injustice and Unsustainability in the Global Economy (with Kenneth Gould and Allan Schnaiberg, Paradigm Press, 2008); Resisting Global Toxics: Transnational Movements for Environmental Justice (MIT Press, 2007); The Silicon Valley of Dreams: Environmental Injustice, Immigrant Workers, and the High-Tech Global Economy (with Lisa Sun-Hee Park, New York University Press, 2002); Garbage Wars: The Struggle for Environmental Justice in Chicago (MIT Press, 2002); Urban Recycling and the Search for Sustainable Community Development (with Adam Weinberg and Allan Schnaiberg, Princeton University Press, 2000); Power, Justice, and the Environment: A Critical Appraisal of the Environmental Justice Movement (editor, with Robert J. Brulle, MIT Press, 2005); and Challenging the Chip: Labor Rights and Environmental Justice in the Global Electronics Industry (co-editor, with Ted Smith, David Sonnenfeld, and Leslie Byster, Temple University Press, 2006). Previously he has acted as Professor and Don A. Martindale Endowed Chair of Sociology at the University of Minnesota where he teaches courses on social movements, environmental justice, globalization, immigration, and race and ethnicity. He has served on the Boards of Directors of several community-based, national, and international organizations that are dedicated to improving the living and working environments for people of color, immigrants, indigenous peoples, and working class communities.

Discipline: Sociology